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Angaza Peer Educators and Counselling Centre

Angaza Peer Educators and Counselling Centre

Kwa Simba Sokoni,Vingunguti ward at Ilala district

Our mission in to increase response, access, knowledge and quality on HIV/AIDS services and behavior change communication to children, youth and people living with HIV/AIDS in Tanzanian by conducting training, counseling, home care, spiritual counseling, testing and sensitization

To establish friendly center for youth and people infected and affect by HIV/AIDS for information and services on HIV/AIDS and other related issues in five Tanzanian zones.Title of Project: Understanding and Challenging HIV/AIDS Stigma in secondary schools

Amount of grant requested in TZS:
193,151,523 Contribution of the Applicants (if any)
3,000,000
Proposed duration of project (# of months): 12 Months
Name of Applicant (In the case of a partnership, the lead organisation)
National Youth Information Centre Trust Fund
Type of Organisation: Non Governmental Organization.
Date of Registration (Registration number):
November 23rd 2001. Trustees
Bank Information (Name, Address, Account number):
Account Name: National Youth Information Centre Trust Fund
Account Number:
01J1027608200

Name of Bank
CRDB Bank Azikiwe Branch

Address:
P.O. Box 72344, Dar es Salaam – Tanzania

Telephone
+255-22-2124556

Address for correspondence purposes:
Kijitonyama Plot Number 10 Block 46,
Africa Sana Road Opp. Mwenge Mosque
P.O.BOX 79424
Dar es Salaam
Telephone: +255 22 2775893 or 0784386744 Fax:

E-mail: nicetz@yahoo.com

Contact name(s):
Chrispin Mwansanga Position:
Executive Director
Names and addresses of other partners involved in the partnership (add an extra page if needed):

N/A

Describe the institutional partners (narrative): Include institutional history of the lead organisation, geographical coverage and size of the organisation. Describe the specific expertise of the partner (s), including partner’s experience with projects similar to the one proposed and the source of funds of those projects. Include all recent donor experiences.
Lead Organisation:
National Youth Information Centre Trust Fund (NICE) is non-governmental, non-profit, charitable youth organization formed and registered in Tanzania on 23rd November 2001 under trustees’ incorporation ordinance of 1956 (cap 375).
NICE was formed from a series of discussions conducted by students at the University of Dar es Salaam trying to find out, why the majority of Tanzanian youths including the graduates are not reaching/realizing their full potentials. We came out with several reasons, and the major one was lack of Proper and Timely Information. The majority of Tanzanian youths in general, and those in rural areas in particular lack proper information surrounding their lives. They lack proper and timely information about health, education, human rights and good governance etc.
In recognition of this situation NICE was formed as one of the strategy of complementing efforts by government and other actors, to ensure that Tanzanian youths develop their full potentials and participate effectively in public affairs. NICE is visioning to ensure that every youth in Tanzania especially, the poor, female youths, disabled youths and those living in rural areas have basic access to information and resources, which helps them to reach/realize their full potentials. The organization mission is to facilitate the empowerment of youth to enable them make informed decisions about all aspects of their lives. NICE activities focus on four main thematic areas, which are Education, Health, Employment and Human rights and Good Governance.
The programs implemented by the NICE are strategically directed into five administrative regions of Tanzania mainland. These are Dar-es-salaam, Mbeya, Ruvuma, Kigoma, Morogoro. Currently it has three branches in Mbeya, Kigoma and Ruvuma where by several initiatives is currently implementing for educating and promoting youth HIV/AIDS and sexual reproductive health issues within the area. In the last three years the organization has implemented 6 projects of which 2 projects focused on HIV/AIDS and reproductive health. We have managed to implement the HIV/AIDS stigma reduction project in Mbeya region. The project intended to increase awareness on HIV/AIDS and stigma related issues and support young people living with HIV/AIDS. This project was financially conducted in partnerships with FORUM SYD and Mbeya Rural District Council. In 2007 Forum Syd provided the grant for expansion. This project involved out of schools youths in Ulenje ward.
NICE has been engaging in policy formulation process and analysis for the purpose of increasing youth awareness on policy issues. NICE has been implementing the policy analysis project funded by the Foundation For civil Society. The project increased youth awareness and participation on the national employment policy and the national HIV/AIDS policy. The project also facilitate youth ideas and suggestions and provide feed back to the government and policy makers towards the youth effective and active participation on policy formulation and policy making process at the local and national level.
In February 2007, NICE kigoma branch received funds from SIDA to conduct HIV/AIDS awareness to youths in Kigoma rural district. The project involved training of 50 TOTs who trained 500 youths.
NICE also provide social material support to HIV and AIDS vulnerable children’s in Ruvuma region under financial support from African Communities network. The grant supported 150 children
In partnership with the Sokoine University of Agriculture under her PANTIL program, NICE is conducting two weeks entrepreneurship training to finalist students. The program started in 2007 and will end in 2010. The PANTIL program is funded by NUFFIC.
Following NICE’s interest in implementing stigma projects, in March 2008, NICE was invited to training on ant stigma training. In this training which was conducted and funded by PACT Tanzania 2 nice members were involved in this.
This project will help to create a valuable anti-stigma network for students in the selected ten secondary schools. In addition, the project will enhance the HIV/AIDS understanding among youth beyond the targeted schools, as the project materials and information will be shared throughout the region.
In implementing her projects, NICE does establish groups and clubs in order to facilitate easy coordination, ownership of the program and sharing of merger resources from the centre. The same approach will be used when implementing this project in the targeted schools.

No partner will be involved in this project

Section 2: Project Description
Priority areas included (tick all applicable)
 v Prevention
 advocacy, IEC
 Care and Support
 Research
 Impact mitigation
 Institutional capacity building
 Children (aged 0-8 years) infected or affected by HIV/AIDS
Proposed geographical location (districts, municipalities, regions)
Mbeya Rural District in Mbeya Region.
Target Population (describe and give numbers)
The target population is students from 6 secondary schools in Mbeya rural district. The schools are Irambo, Itala, Ilungu, Iwalanje, Igoma, and Tembela.
20 students at each of the six schools will be trained as peer educators on HIV/AIDS anti-stigma issues, making a total of 120 direct beneficiaries. The 120 peer educators will be trained to deal and/or work with peer groups of not less than 20 students in communicating anti-stigma messages and motivating their peers to take action. Through the 120 per educators, 2400 students will be reached with anti-stigma messages. Throughout the program we will ensure that we recruit an almost equal number of girls and boys peer educators as well as ensuring that there is equal participation of girls and boys. It is estimated that at the end of the project more than 6,000 young people will be reached with anti-stigma messages. Therefore many students will continue to benefit from products of this project even after phasing out.
A. Project Summary: Briefly describe the project under the following headings:
Problem Statement
Clearly describe the specific problem this proposal seeks to address. Include a description of the target population. Provide quantified information whenever possible. (one paragraph only)
Mbeya Rural HIV prevalence rate is 13.5% (R&AWG, 2006), Yet few students know their HIV status because of persistent stigma. As stigma leads to secrecy, many students show an unwillingness to participate in voluntary testing stemming from unguided fears attached to the HIV/AID pandemic. This situation may be one of the factors fuelling further spread of HIV/AIDS. The spread of HIV/AIDS in the area is associated with the influx of businessmen who travel from Makete District to Mbeya City.
General objective of the project: (max 3 lines only)
To overcome the existing HIV/AIDS stigma that creates fear among secondary school students and therefore severely inhibits the efforts to curb further impact of this epidemic among young people
Strategies of the project: (provide a bulleted list)
●To train student peer educators on HIV/AIDS anti-stigma communication.
●To initiate the HIV/AIDS anti-stigma campaign among students.
●To establish HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma information and educational material
● Monitoring and Evaluation

B. Detailed description of proposed project
(This section should include the key issues the project is intended to address and how it will make a difference)

The issue of stigma and discrimination remains a formidable challenge that must be addressed in the prevention and control of the epidemic. Stigma against HIV/AIDS remains very strong and plays a major role in fuelling the epidemic. Only 22 percent of women and 27 percent of men on mainland Tanzania and Zanzibar have an accepting attitude towards all people living with HIV/AIDS
This project seeks to address the prevailing stigmatized perception on HIV/AIDS among youths in secondary schools. It has been observed that stigmatized perception on the HIV/AIDS epidemic leads to unguided fears which in turn retard the general effort to combat or mitigate the impact of the HIV/AIDS among youth. Many secondary schools in Tanzania continue to lose many people including students and teachers to HIV/AIDS; but due to the secrecy which is deeply rooted in stigmatized perception on HIV/AIDS it has rarely been acknowledged that many of those deaths were the result of the HIV/AIDS.
This stigmatized perception on HIV/AIDS among students in secondary schools does not only retard efforts in curbing further impact of this epidemic but also fuels into the further negative impact of HIV/AIDS. This project therefore seeks to initiate efforts to reverse this trend by fighting the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS among young people in these secondary schools.

Over the years, NICE has acquired a great amount of experience working with young people. Therefore, through this project NICE wants to use their experience to influence more youth to reverse the current stigmatized perception of HIV/AIDS. Currently, NICE has clubs in formed by out of school youths who participate in the HIV/AIDS prevention implemented in Irambo village, Igoma village, Mbonile Village and Ukulila village in Ulenje ward ..
NICE has trained personnel on stigma and how to address the challenges. The officials were trained by PACT Tanzania.
In 2006 under the funding of Forum Syd Tanzania, NICE trained more than 60 TOT among out of schools youths on how to overcome the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS. These training were conducted in Kigoma Rural District and Mbeya Rural District in the mentioned villages. During the implementation of this project NICE conducted a small baseline survey to gauge the level at which young people in secondary schools do perceive the HIV/AIDS as it relates to them as individuals. NICE sent out 100 standardized questionnaires to students in Irambo secondary schools, Sangu secondary School and Itala secondary school. 75 questionnaires were returned. The study found that many of our respondents had stigmatized perceptions of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. For instance it was revealed that 80% of the respondent had never tested and would not test voluntarily because they are scared of being HIV positive. However the baseline further revealed that 76% of the respondents had stigmatized perception on various aspects of HIV/AIDS pandemic . Stigmatized perception of HIV/AIDS here refers to the understanding which regards HIV/AIDS as a fact external to the individual, where as respondents fail to reflect themselves as potential victims. To them HIV/AIDS is for those uneducated and not for them.
It is well known that stigma attached to HIV/AIDS is one of the major obstacles in fighting the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Studies shows that 85% - 90% of the Tanzanian population are HIV negative , it is an assumption of this project therefore that many students in these secondary schools are still not infected with HIV virus but due to their fears attached to this epidemic to avoid infection and for those who are/or will be identified as HIV positive, it is essential for them to receive appropriate counselling and care in coping with their health status, which will in turn, prolong their lives and keeping other from becoming infected.

This project therefore seeks to contribute to the many efforts in mitigating the impact of the HIV/AIDS in the country. In specific it seeks to contribute to the second cluster of MKUKUTA goal one on the HIV/AIDS prevalence targeting young people from 15 to 24 by developing programmes that aims at reducing fears attached to HIV/AIDS among youth. NICE will use club members and non club members in a ripple effect manner which ensures that it continues reaching more students from an initial group of 300 trained student peer educators. It is the assumption of this project that the anti-stigma messages will keep trickling to other students by using their schools NICE clubs with periodic supplement of various information and education materials when the project is completed or comes to an end.
The war against HIV/AIDS has attracted high external funding, especially in treating HIV/AIDS infected people. Most of these funding have their time limit. Many people are wondering on what will happen when these funding dries out . This project therefore provides a response to this situation because the project’s outputs will keep on benefiting many more youth beyond the lifespan of this project.
Through this project, NICE will train 50 peer educators from each of the selected schools on ways to overcome the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS as a way of mitigating further impact of this epidemic. The 50 students will be carefully selected to ensure all interest groups in each school are represented. The training will be facilitated by 4 peer educators who were trained by Pact – Tanzania. Some of them are currently in higher learning institutions. The 4 peer educators will undergo a five days refresher course before the start conducting trainings. One training workshop will be organized at each school, and each workshop will run for five days in order to cover all important aspects of addressing the HIV/AIDS stigma.
Peer educators training will focus on concepts in stigmatization such as sex, gender and sex, African social cultural taboos, morality, blame and shame. The training will also focus on empowering peer educators on enhancing their understanding on the HIV/AIDS epidemic and skills to overcome fears attached to HIV/AIDS.
Peer educators will also be empowered with effective facilitation skills, especially on how to communicate their anti-stigma messages to their colleagues. Various facilitation skills to be used in these training will include facilitating brainstorming buzz group facilitation; facilitating groups discussions based on visual illustrations, facilitation through role plays and other entertainment methods.

Project Activities in each strategy

Strategy I: To Train Students peer educators to overcome HIV/AIDS:
■ Project introduction and selecting peer educators to be involved in the project
The Executive Director of NICE together with Mbeya branch coordinator will visit all schools and office of the DED to introduce the project and select peer educator. We will work with student associations and office of the dean and discuss with their leaders on selecting a core group of individuals to be trained as peer educators. Each school will identify 50 people to be trained as peer educators. The selected peer educators will come from different classes. And will inform them to select 25 girls and 25 boys to ensure gender equality.
■ completing the baseline survey on HIV/AIDS stigma
As mentioned above, NICE conducted a small baseline survey with students from Irambo, Itala and Sangu secondary schools to gauge the extent to which stigma retards the fight against HIV/AIDS. It is the aim of this project to conduct a similar survey in other schools for the same purpose. The findings will be very useful in evaluating the performance of this project during and after the implementation. The findings will also help NICE and students when preparing IEC materials.
As discussed in activity 1 each of the
50 selected students will be given 3 questionnaires to administer among fellow students. The project expects to receive more than 500 feedbacks in this initiative. The questionnaires will be compiled by a statistical programme for the social sciences to enhance the quality of the findings.

■ Anti-stigma training workshops to peer educators:
As mentioned above the selected 300 peer educators will be trained on concepts and how to overcome the stigma attached to HIV/AIDS. The training will be guided with the anti-stigma guideline that was developed by Pact – Tanzania including Tanzanian and Zambian local NGOs. Peer educators will also be empowered with clear understanding of stigmatization, consequences of stigmatization and how young people can play a positive role in reversing the current trend. Peer educators will also be empowered with skills and techniques to help young people overcome their fears on HIV/AIDS.

Training topics will include the following; the first component will focus on naming the problem ‘stigma’ in their own perceptions, the meaning of stigma as well as forms, causes and effects of stigma, starting with self-stigma. The second component will focus on increasing the understanding on HIV/AIDS so as to register a decrease in the fears attached to HIV/AIDS. This will include assessing knowledge levels about HIV/AIDS among students, assessing fears of HIV/AIDS as it relates to sex and sexuality, morality.
Shame and blame. Other issues will include breaking the sex ice, abstinence, safe sex ‘condoms’ and stings. Peer educators will also revisit the social cultural factors that contribute to the stigmatization including the discussion on gender roles and relationships that influence communication as well as practices that affect youth engagement in safe sexual behaviour.
After training peer educators from each college will get together and make a college-wide annual anti-stigma work plan to be executed in their respective college. Five anti-stigma work plans will be established; these plans will come up with new and innovative methods for fighting HIV/AIDS stigma in higher learning institutions. Facilitators will work closely with each peer educator team in order to establish realistic work plans that can be easily executed and measured.

Strategy 2: To initiate the HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma campaign among students:

1. Actual anti-stigma campaign in their respective schools:
This is where the wheel touches the road. Here peer educators will begin making a difference in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Peer educators will be assisted to work closely in initiate the anti-stigma campaign in their schools. This is the second stage of the ripple effect[5] which is very pertinent in the achievement of this project. In order to do this peer educators will be exposed to various ways of how to communicate their anti-stigma messages to their peers.
They will include the following:-
■ Enhancing /or establishing NICE clubs.
NICE clubs brings young people together where they can plan and implement projects together. The NICE head quarters office supports these clubs with educational materials and links them with other similar clubs in Tanzania. Currently there NICE clubs in the following villages, Irambo, Igoma and Itala in Ulenje ward Mbeya .We also have clubs in Ukulila and Mbonile villages The later two are relatively new and will need more support.
In addition peer educators will work with NICE head quarters office in enhancing and/or forming new NICE clubs. The formation and/or strengthening of the NICE clubs will ensure the continuum of the anti-stigma campaign when the project is completed.
■ Organizing weekend anti-stigma bonanzas.
Each school will organize weekend anti-stigma bonanzas, at least once each quarter. Live music from prominent local stars will be organized so as to attract more students to attend. During the bonanzas the peer educators will work hand in hand with professional counsellors in communicating anti-stigma messages. Professional counsellors from government will include districts AIDS coordinators and health officials. NICE has worked closely with Ms. Mberwa, Rachael, the Council HIV/ AIDS coordinators in Mbeya Rural Council. Inspirational personal stories will also be used in order to inspire more youth in overcome their fears. Benefits in voluntary testing to both non infected and infected young people will be thoroughly discussed; however consequences of not knowing one’s health status ahead of time will also be thoroughly discussed in order to overcome their fears.
The project will approach respected/ or admired people to come and launch some of the anti-stigma bonanzas. The project targets at approaching the like of His Excellency President Kikwete, Former President Ali Hassan Mwinyi etc. Such prominent figures will attract more students to the bonanza as well as provide inspiration to fight HIV/AIDS stigma.
■ Individual HIV/AIDS counselling and voluntary testing services:
The project will also arrange for both individual HIV/AIDS counselling and voluntary testing serves to be available during the bonanzas. The project will approach various programmes dealing with VCTs including ANGAZA. This will help students who have overcome their fears to take the next step, be tested to test and begin their new lives with new determination and zeal in fighting HIV/AIDS. This will continue even after the project’s phase out because the project will be establishing a relationship and working closely with already established government VCTs.
■ A friend to friend approach;
A friend to friend approach will be unstructured to allow peer educators to use a combination of techniques. All peer educators will be required to maintain day to day contact with at least 15 peers in their schools with an intention of constantly sharing various anti-stigma messages that seek to reduce fear. This will include many ways such as face to face contacts, forwarding short anti-stigma text messages to peers, etc,
The project will make an arrangement to receive comments and messages to be used in communicating anti-stigma messages by text messages. Local artists will be sought to convert these messages into cartoons so that they are user friendly in communicating anti-stigma messages to peer students.

Strategy 3: To establish HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma information and educational materials:
1. Developing and disseminating IEC Anti-stigma materials
Various IEC materials will be developed and disseminated to students in the project area and other interested students throughout the country. Selected Peer educators and the IEC materials specialist will organize a 3 days IEC development workshop. They are expected to come up with the following types of materials
■ Anti-stigma pamphlets:
The project will develop and disseminate 4,000 copies of the anti-stigma pamphlets. These pamphlets will aim at inspiring individual students to take a bold step in overcoming fear. Other information will include personal information on how one should prepare for voluntary testing and how to lead one’s life after that. The pamphlet will further inspire an individual reader to take part in the project’s aim of reaching more young people, through the ripple effect.
■Quarterly anti-stigma students’ newsletter
The project will collect many stories regarding the project implementation and other useful anti-stigma information to be issued in a quarterly newsletter. A copy of these newsletters will be circulated electronically as well as uploaded onto the NICE global website in order to expand the horizon of shared learning among students in schools.
■ Project’s information brochures
The project will also develop project brochures. They will include quick anti-stigma facts, the aim of the project, how to take part in the initiative, and important contacts.
■ Anti-stigma cartoons
The project will arrange a way to collect stories, facts, and lessons in the fight against HIV/AIDS stigma and turn them into cartoons. This has proven to be an effective way in communicating messages to youth. NICE maintains a good working relationship with some young artists who will be willing to work with the project for small stipends. These cartoons will be featured in anti-stigma newsletters and others will be forwarded through student email across the country.

Strategy 4: Monitoring and evaluating the performance of the project:
1. Monitoring and evaluation
The project will develop a detailed performance management plan (PMP) so as to ensure that the project is managed for the planned results. Project staff will monitor and communicate with all important stakeholders on a regular basis. The monitoring and evaluation of this project will consist of the following:
■ Monthly progress reports
A special reporting format will be developed; this will be used by each peer educator in capturing important issues during the implementation of the project. This form is expected to be only one page, with leading questions in a chart form so that they are easy to use. These reports will be submitted to the club secretary in each respective school. The secretary will also have another form to accommodate all important project information.
■ Quarterly evaluation meetings
In each quarter all 50 peer educators in each school will conduct a one day evaluation meeting to gauge their performance. These meetings will be facilitated by the two project officers and other NICE staff. This will be an important tool in assisting peer educators in managing their performance with their eyes on the anticipated results. This is an important component not only to the project but also to all stakeholders as it will provide the opportunity to share lessons in the HIV/AIDS anti-stigma campaign. Outstanding achievements will be shared to all school students through peer contacts.
■ Quarterly technical evaluations
The project will be evaluated by two technical consultants each quarter. These consultants will be professional social workers with proven experience in working on HIV/AIDS youth related programmes. Evaluations will be based on the detailed performance management plan which, as stated above will be developed prior to the actual implementation of the project.
■ Pre and post evaluation of the HIV/AIDS stigma
The project will also conduct a pre and post evaluation of the HIV/AIDS stigma in order to gauge the pre and post status in HIV/AIDS stigma in the project area. The baseline survey which will be conducted in the beginning will also provide necessary information for the pre evaluation and at the end of the project there will be a post evaluation to gauge the impact of the project.
■ Quarterly and Final reports
The project will prepare and submit quarterly and final reports. Both will include narrative and financial reports to be submitted to the Grants Manager’s Office.
TABLE 1 – Strategies/Activities/Outputs
For each strategy, list the activities that will be conducted and their quantified outputs. If a baseline exists for an activity, please state it. Add more tables and lines if you have more strategies and activities.
Strategy 1: To train students peer educators to overcome HIV/AIDS stigma.
Activities Baseline Position (if it exists) Quantified Outputs
On participative basis with students associations select students to be trained as peer educators 0 300 students will be selected to be trained as peer educators trained on how to over-come HIV/AIDS stigma.
Finalize the baseline survey The project has feedback from 1 school The project will get feedback from all 6 schools
Conduct the anti-stigma training workshop to the identified peer educators. 6 300 peer educators will be trained on how to over-come HIV/AIDS
Establish Anti-stigma work plans with each school. 0 6 Anti-stigma work plans will be developed for each school

Strategy 2: To initiate the HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma campaign among students.
Activities Baseline Position (if it exists) Quantified Outputs
Enhance or establish NICE clubs in each school 0 NICE clubs 6 NICE clubs will be established in the chosen schools.
Organizing week-end anti-stigma bonanzas in each school each quarter. 0 20 HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma weekend bonanzas will be organized.
Organizing individual HIV/AIDS counselling and voluntary testing for the inspired students. Don’t know 20 HIV/AIDS counselling and voluntary testing sessions are organized.
Initiating and maintaining a friend to friend anti-stigma approach 0 At least more than 3,000 students are in constant communication on anti-stigma messages

Strategy 3: To establish HIV/AIDS Anti-stigma information and educational materials.
Activities Baseline Position (if it exists) Quantified Outputs
Development and distribution of the anti-stigma IEC materials such as Anti stigma pamphlets, quarterly anti-stigma students’ newsletter and the anti-stigma brochures.  Anti-stigma pamphlets – 0
 Anti-stigma newsletters – 0
 Anti-stigma brochures – 0 The following IEC materials will be developed and disseminated.
 Anti-stigma pamphlets – 5,000 copies
 Anti-stigma newsletters – 20,000 copies
 Anti-stigma brochures – 5,000
Establishing and maintaining an anti-stigma network among students by text messages. 0 Anti-stigma student network by text– more than 3,000 students will be in the anti-stigma text messages

Strategy 4: To monitor and evaluate the performance of the project.
Activities Baseline Position (if it exists) Quantified Outputs
Monthly reports from each peer educator 0 2,700 reports will be written by peer educators
Quarterly peer educators’ evaluation meetings in each school. 0 20 quarterly peer educators’ evaluation meetings will be conducted.
Pre and post evaluations of the anti-stigma status 1 pre evaluation which did not cover other schools. Pre and post evaluations on the status of HIV/AIDS stigma done.
Quarterly technical evaluations 0 4 technical evaluations are conducted.

Section 3: Partnership
(This section should only be completed if this proposal is being submitted in partnership)
a) If this proposal calls for partnership between the Grantee and other institutions, please describe the specific role of each partner in carrying out the strategic and the project coordination/management

Not applicable

b) Financial Arrangement: How will funds and resources be transferred between partners?

Not Applicable

Section 4: Urgency and Sustainability

In this section you should analyse and cover the following:
a) Why does this project have to be conducted at this time? Is it urgent? Does it fill a gap of any kind? Does it provide a transition towards other efforts?
This project is urgent because although the HIV/AIDS awareness among young people is relatively high, many still are negatively influenced with fear that limits them from open conversation and voluntary testing. The fear among students on HIV/AIDS is either addressed in an ad hoc manner or is not addressed at all. This situation limits the impact of efforts in the struggle against HIV/AIDS. Given the location of these schools i.e. between Makete district and Mbeya City poses them at a higher risk. HIV prevalence in this area is 14% the highest in Tanzania
This project therefore attempts to reverse this situation. This project acts as a seed to be sown in selected schools but with planned benefits to many young people especially those in other secondary schools in Mbeya region.

b) Does this project build upon documented best practices or norms and standards? Or How is this project innovative?
This project builds on the peer educators’ model in communicating anti-stigma messages to youth. It is innovative in the sense that it uses the ripple effect model to sustain the impact of the project to benefit more young people after the project’s lifespan. It is also innovative in a sense that it specifically addressing fears on HIV/AIDS that leads to HIV/AIDS stigma which in turn retards the struggle against HIV/AIDS. This project is also innovative in the sense that it reaches many youth through the NICE publications; the output of this project therefore will benefit more youths in the country.

c) At the end of this project, will products, activities, staff be absorbed into your ongoing program or will they require new funding?
NICE has just launched a new programme for the secondary school students’ entitled Young and creative entrepreneurs”. This programme seeks to equip young people in secondary schools with entrepreneurship skills that will help them to start their independent lives when they graduate from secondary school. This programme offers soft skills training on business management and life skills including HIV/AIDS. The achievement registered by this project will be adopted into the NICE programme including one additional programme officer who will be in charge of the secondary school programme. Anti-stigma information and educational materials will be shared within the NICE national programme not only to the members at that age group, information and education materials will also benefit a larger network of NICE members.

d) If your institution or partners benefit from PEPFAR, TMAP or Global Fund support, how will this RFE project complement those activities?
NICE does not benefit from PEPFAR program; however our two officers did receive training from PACT Tanzania. The training was anti-stigma training for peer educators.

Section 5: Monitoring and Evaluation

Because these are short-term projects, health or quality of life impact cannot be evaluated. However, short-term changes in access, demand, quality and capacity can be measured. How will you gather information and measure on each of your quantified outputs? Which staff member(s) will be involved in monitoring and evaluation?

Technical monitoring:

As mentioned above the project will be evaluated by two local consultants who have excellent experience as social workers in HIV/AIDS. This will happen every quarter in order to gauge the level of the project’s impact as it relates to the established performance management plan (PMP). The feedback from evaluations will help NICE to adjust some of its components to ensure that the project achieves the intended objectives.
The established performance management plan will be revised and/or updated periodically depending on the prevailing situation on the ground. Amendments to the PMP will be made with consultations from RFE Grants Manager’s office. NICE is dedicated to constant and ongoing project evaluation in order to make sure that our activities are effectively reaching the goals we have set, while achieving effective results in our overall organizational goals and remaining relevant to the audiences we serve.
The purpose of evaluation is not to discover that programs are working perfectly, rather it is to learn how we can improve them to serve members more effectively and achieve effective results. Therefore, we will use feedback from the program evaluations to learn how we can best meet the needs of our members.

Financial monitoring: What governance, accounting and monitoring systems will be put into place?
NICE has clear financial policies that are implemented with the support of well defined financial procedures. The Financial Manager is responsible for all internal and external financial arrangements where NICE wants or seeks to establish a partnership in development.

NICE uses QuickBooks financial software in maintaining financial records. If this proposal becomes successful a special project code will be developed and used for the project implementation. A separate bank account for the project will be opened depending on the directives from RFE.

Quarterly financial reports will be drafted accompanied by monthly programme reports to be shared with RFE Grants Manager’s office.

Section 6: Institutional Capacity

In this section you should provide information on key Project management staff and a brief description on your implementation plan:
a) What is the experience and track record of the project manager and 2 key people? (Brief CV’s of the Project Manager, Lead Technical person if different from Project Manager and the Financial Manager should be provided in the appendices).
The project will be managed by Mr. Chrispin Mwansanga, the Executive Director of NICE. Mr. Mwansanga holds a Postgraduate Diploma in Forced Migration and Refugees Studies focusing on humanitarianism from the American University in Cairo and a Bachelor of Arts with Education from the University of Dar es Salaam. He has an excellent experience in working with young people in many spheres of life including HIV/AIDS. He has successfully managed grants from Forum Syd- Tanzania, The Foundation for Civil Societies and Argentariaus Foundation. All projects were implemented targeting youths in Tanzania.

Financial Manager of this project will be Mr. Benedicto John, Mr. John is our Financial Manager; he is a certified public accountant with an Advanced Diploma from Institute of Financial Management. Mr. John is in-charge of all institutional financial matters.
(C.V of both Mr. Mwansanga and Mr. John are attached with this proposal as annexes)

b) How will the executive direction and administrative support for the project be delivered?
The project will be directly implemented by the two project officers who will be reporting to the project manager. The project manager will supervise the whole project in close consultation with the NICE chairman of the Board Prof. Daniel Mkude. However the project manager and project staff will receive all necessary administrative support from all responsible departments including the administration and finance department.

c) C) Explain how your institution separates technical and financial authority.
This project will be implemented in the NICE’s administrative structure. NICE have four administrative departments, which are Education, Health, Human Rights and Good Governance and Finance and Administration department. Each department is headed by the program coordinator. All coordinators are reporting to the Executive Director. Therefore the health coordinator will work with the Executive Director who will also provide further technical input to the project. The Project Manager will also receive financial management support from the finance department, which is led by the Financial Manager, who is registered as a certified public accountant. The project accountant of this project will receive direct supervision from the financial Manager and the project accountant will be responsible to the every day financial management of the project.
NICE is a well established organization with clear financial policy and financial procedures. This project will also be implemented according to these established financial structures.

Section 6b: Implementation Work plan (add more lines within each month as needed)

Month Activities to be carried out in each month (give numbers if possible) Responsible
1
Developing a detailed project’s performance management plan (PMP). Project Manager in consultation with all staff including the M&E Officer.
Recruiting and orienting two project officer Human Resource Officer in consultation other staff including Project Manager.
Purchasing necessary items for the project Administration department
Introducing the project to leaders and head of school, later on Pre evaluation on HIV/AIDS stigma among students Project Manager, Project staff and consultants.
2
Producing the Anti-stigma pamphlets Project staff
Refresher course to the 4 peer educator who will train peer educators from schools Consultant
Conducting training workshops to the selected peer educators. Project staff together with government staff
3
Reinventing the anti-stigma ripple effect wheel in the chosen Schools.
■Anti-stigma week end bonanzas.
■Individual counselling and testing
■A friend to friend approach Peer educators, project staff and government staff
The first Quarterly anti-stigma newsletter is produced and distributed. Project staff
The first quarterly evaluation meetings will be conducted. Peer educators and project staff
4
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing Peer educators, project staff and government staff
5
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing Peer educators, project staff and government staff
6
Continue with the anti-stigma ripple effect wheel in the chosen universities.
■Anti-stigma week end bonanzas.
■Individual counselling and testing
■A friend to friend approach Peer educators, project staff and government staff
The Second Quarterly anti-stigma newsletter is produced and distributed. Project staff
The second quarterly evaluation meetings will be conducted. Peer educators and project staff
7
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing Peer educators, project staff and government staff
8
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing.

Peer educators, project staff and government staff
9
Continue with the anti-stigma ripple effect wheel in the chosen schools.
■Anti-stigma week end bonanzas.
■Individual counselling and testing
■A friend to friend approach Peer educators, project staff and government staff
The third Quarterly anti-stigma newsletter is produced and distributed. Project staff
The third quarterly evaluation meetings will be conducted. Peer educators and project staff
10
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing Peer educators, project staff and government staff
11
A friend to friend approaches
Individual counselling and testing Peer educators, project staff and government staff
12
Continue with the anti-stigma ripple effect wheel in the chosen schools.
■Anti-stigma week end bonanzas.
■Individual counselling and testing
■A friend to friend approach Peer educators, project staff and government staff
The Fourth Quarterly anti-stigma newsletter is produced and distributed. Project staff
The Fourth quarterly evaluation meetings. Peer educators and project staff
Post project evaluations Project staff and consultants
Project close out Project staff and M&E officer

Section 7: Risk

In this section you should explain:

Why you (and partners) believe the project can be delivered in the time scale envisaged and within the proposed funding profile.

The project will be delivered because NICE has excellent experiencing in implementing anti-stigma campaigns and a strong background in working with young people. In addition, NICE has already discussed the possibility of this project with all six school and all are eager to participate in this project. Also NICE has established a good working relationship with district authority and the ministry of Education and training from the central level to the district level..

What are the main risks that may delay or reduce the effectiveness of this project and what are your contingency plans for dealing with these risks.
■ Untimely and/or late funds disbursement, we have experienced problems in timely disbursement of funds in our projects; this has often affected the project implementation negatively. In consultation with the RFE Grants Manager’s office, the NICE will arrange for the availability of the project funds internally to be replaced with any unforeseen delays.

■ Some delays in obtaining government staff to work with the project. The project will make prior arrangement with responsible government authorities, however the project expects to engage most of the government people during their weekend break e.g. during weekend anti-stigma bonanzas. NICE’s visit during introduction of this project to them will create a conducive environment for them to participate. So far the district CHAC is aware of this project.

Section 8: Financial Information

The financial information requires a breakdown of the sources of funding for the project and how this funding will be spent during the course of the project (Appendix 1 Tables 1, 2 and 3). MS Excel templates have been provided and should be adapted as appropriate for your project. Please note that financial information provided in any format other than the MS Excel templates provided will not be accepted.

Using narrative, financial tables and diagrams as appropriate:

a) Provide a detailed breakdown of activity costs (Appendix 1 Table 1).

b) Provide a detailed breakdown of activity costs split by quarter (Appendix 1 Table 2).

c) Provide a summary of requested project funds, funds/resources contributed by partners and total project funds split by quarter (Appendix 1 Table 3).
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Section 1: Project information

1.1. Project Title:
Raising community understanding on the primary sources of MSM, DA and CSW

1.2. Thematic area
Safety Nets

1.3. Overall Goal of the project
To contribute towards improving immoral community behaviors accelerating children and youths engagement into illegal groups of Men having Sex with men, Commercial sex workers and Drug abusers by activating the government and the general public’s attention to this course and hence set a foundation for the future generation.

1.4. Project summary
The project intends to strengthen communities on constructive and sustainable approaches of tackling the negative community perceptions and attitudes towards MSM, CSWs and DAs. The community will be fully involved in various ways to brighten their understanding of the sources of such kind of behaviors and how they have been the major contributing factors to such kind of behaviors since when the child is born. The project will also ensure that, the entire community stops blaming, pointing fingers on the MSM, CSWs and Drug abusers; instead they will be facilitated to come up with constructive approaches and strategies towards alleviating such practices. The project activities will be implemented in close collaboration with the ministry of gender, women and children, Ministry of health and social welfare, members of parliament committees, police, prisons and streets government in the respective wards.

Main development Objective is to control/stop illegitimate/immoral community behaviors accelerating youth’s engagement in Men having sex with men (MSM), Women having sex with Women(WSW) Commercial Sex Workers(CSW) and Drug abusers (DA) by activating the government and the general public’s attention to this course and hence set a foundation for the future generation. The main intervention will be to raise community awareness mainly education and advocacy on the origin of such behaviors from the family to the community levels, develop IEC materials for education, networking with other stakeholders i.e. Media as well as developing common strategies towards proper parenting and early child care,

1.5. Problem Statement
Tanzania like in many other sub-Saharan African countries, MSM, DA and commercial sex work has been rampant while at the same time not legalized and rather a criminal offence. Religion, community, Government and traditional leaders are criticizing the existence of these groups. Nevertheless, the profession is growing rapidly each passing day this is justified by the study carried down by the TAWIF which revealed the estimates of three thousands of commercial sex workers including MSM and WSW in Kinondoni Municipality out of 1.5 million people residing in the area
In 2008/09, TAWIF has been implementing a comprehensive Prevention of HIV/AIDS among CSWs, including Men having sex with Men and Drug Abusers in Kinondoni Municipality. However in the course of implementing the said project, experience revealed that, contrary to developed countries where this group get involved in this out of their choice, in developing countries particularly Tanzania Men having Sex with Men, Commercial sex workers and Drug abusers are the victims of the circumstances including poverty, being sodomised by the family members, religious leaders and teachers at very early ages mostly below ten years old.
The heartbreaking narrative about it is that once the parents or guardians realized that, their children have been trapped into it at a very late stage, they chase them out of the family. The society at large criminalizes them and curses them. They have no solace other than finding their peers. The same society which subject them into this victimization and vulnerability is the same which are the fore front at illegalizing, discriminating and stigmatizing them, the situation does not give any room to have any other alternatives and that is why significant number of this group that we are dealing with are eager to gate chance for the rehabilitation but the environment is no friendly in all perspective including community, government civil society organization illegal and regulatory frame work etc. As a result of this, most female youngsters gave birth to children who followed the same channel of either being an MSM, WSW, DA or CSW which threatens the future of our young generations.
Throughout the implementation of this project, TAWIF learnt a number of lessons as follows:
Most parents do not have time to discuss with their children on day to day life , the assumption of an African context is that a child is can be taken care with any community member so long as he/she is accessible to the child. This was proved to be very un practical since we found out that, most family/community members do not play their roles but rather spoil children and hence the influx of MSM, CSWs and drug abusers

On that ground then, Since TAWIF realizes that, MSM, CSW and DA are illegal in Tanzania. It is high time for a comprehensive educative project be implemented to raise community awareness on the contributory factors accelerating these groups to emerge. TAWIF will focus its intervention on the proper parental care and the importance of stopping extended families to all involved stakeholders including parents, teachers, guardians, other CSOs, religious institutions and the entire community of Kinondoni and Magomeni wards.

1.6. Project Duration
The project will last for 12 months starting from August 2009 to August 2010. Total Amount requested……………………………………

1.7. …………Ref FFCS application manual

Logical framework analysis
OUTCOME INDICATORS OUTPUTS ACTIVITIES
To reduce the influx of MSM, DAs, and CSWs through community awareness creation on proper child care focusing on community responsibilities by 2010  % of identified MSM, DAs and CSWs from Magomeni and Makumbusho wards  75 CSWs, DAs and MSM will have been identified by August 2010
 A full functioning community oriented information sharing system on child abuse in place by August 2010 Identify 75 CSWs, MSM and DAs from Makumbusho and Kinondoni wards to be trained by Dec 2009
% of CSW, MSM, and DAs decreased in the community by September 2010.

Increased level of confidence and reduced stigma among existing CSW, MSM and DAs
By April 2010  75 CSWs, MSM and DAs trained in life skills and how to cope up with the situation by August 2010  Facilitate peer education training to 75 CSW, MSM and DAs
 Facilitate life skills training to 75 CSW, MSM and DAs

% of stakeholders and community at large fully aware of the causes of CSW, MSM and DA from the grassroots level by April 2010  100 key stakeholders from Magomeni and Kinondoni Wards will have been trained on the causes of MSM, DAs and CSW from the community level by July 2009. Facilitate stakeholders training event on the causes of MSM, DAs And CSW in Makumbusho and Kinondoni wards.
% of community member knowledgeable of the stigma effects to CSWs MSM, DAs.

% of community members providing open educational and counseling to MSM, DAs and CSWs on the disadvantages of being into the high risk groups. by April 2010  2 Public sensitization sessions conducted on effects of stigma, causes, proper child care and importance of educating MSM, DAs reaching 3000 community members in Kinondoni and Magomeni wards by December 2010. Conduct two public sensitization meetings in Kinondoni and Makumbusho Wards by august 2010
Number of parents and guardians with high knowledge and understanding on the importance of being close to children, including having discussions with them about their rights from the family level by April 2010  100 parents and guardians trained on proper psychological, physiological and sociological child care including, child rights and transparency among children in Kinondoni and Makumbusho wards by Dec 2010 Facilitate training on proper psychological, physiological and sociological child care, including children rights by Aug 2010
 Number of Ward Primary school teachers with education on the value of taking proper care of a child when at their hands by April 2010  35 teachers trained on proper psychological, physiological and sociological child care including, child rights and transparency among children in Kinondoni and Makumbusho wards by Dec 2010  Facilitate training on proper psychological, physiological and sociological child care, including children rights by Aug 2010
Number of Members of, parliament aware on the rights of a child and how if violated accelerates CSW, MSM and DAs in the community. April 2010 1 National dialogue session conducted  Conduct national dialog meeting in Makumbusho and Kinondoni wards for awareness raising to members of parliament on the child rights and causes of CSW,MSM and DAs in the community by 2010

Outcomes Monitoring Plan

OUTCOMES (significant changes resulting from undertaking project activities) INDICATORS ( as in the logicalframe) Data source How frequent will the data be collected
To reduce the influx of MSM, DAs, and CSWs through community awareness creation on proper child care focusing on community responsibilities by 2010  % of identified MSM, DAs and CSWs from Magomeni and Makumbusho wards  Records of identification survey
Monthtly
 % of CSW, MSM, and DAs decreased in the community by September 2010.

 Increased level of confidence and reduced stigma among existing CSW, MSM and DAs

By April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly
 % of stakeholders and community at large fully aware of the causes of CSW, MSM and DA from the grassroots level by April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly
 % of community member knowledgeable of the stigma effects to CSWs MSM, DAs.

 % of community members providing open educational and counseling to MSM, DAs and CSWs on the disadvantages of being into the high risk groups. by April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly
 Number of parents and guardians with high knowledge and understanding on the importance of being close to children, including having discussions with them about their rights from the family level by April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly
 Number of Ward Primary school teachers with education on the value of taking proper care of a child when at their hands by April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly
 Number of Members of, parliament aware on the rights of a child and how if violated accelerates CSW, MSM and DAs in the community. April 2010  Training reports documents
Monthtly

Section 2: Organizational Details

2.1. Name of the Organization: Tanzania Women of Impact Foundation

2.2. Name you regularly use: TAWIF

2.3. Registration: Registered on 26th March 2005 under the society Ordinance Cap 1954 with Ministry of Home Affairs with registration number. SO 13019
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Angaza Peer Educators and Counseling Centre is a non-Governmental Organization,which started 1999 with 4 founder members.In year 2000 it was register and got registration No:-106110.By that time number of members were increased to 12 founder members.Angaza is a non profit sharing and service delivery organization aiming at reduce the spread of... Read more
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