Envaya

Request Funding for Studies of Leadership and Decision Strategies in Response to the COVID 19 Outbreak: A Case Study of Tanzania

Location: Kihesa CCDO Head Offices, Iringa Town, Iringa Region-Tanzania.

Focus Study Area: Iringa and Dar es Salaam Regions

Account Name: CCDO, Account No: 01J1023036400 CRDB BANK.

Contact Persons:

1)      Majaliwa Mbogella – Chairperson, P.O.Box 1751 Kihesa-Iringa, Tanzania. Email: childrencareorg1@gmail.com or Lmayova@ymail.com

2)      Principal Researcher – Dr. Oscar Garbon, P.O.Box 1751 Kihesa-Iringa, Tanzania. East Africa. Email: childrencareorg1@gmail.com , www.ccdo-tanzania.org, www.envaya.org/ccdo

3)      Project Manager – Dr. Beatrice Mosha, P.O.Box 1751 Kihesa-Iringa, Tanzania. Email: childrencareorg1@gmail.com

 

Duration: 2 Years

Requested Funds: 139771$ (USD)

 

1.0 INTRODUCTION

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) in Tanzania is planning research projects to provide the evidence needed to inform the African Academy of Social Sciences work in the studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, with special focus on the impact on women in Tanzania. This application describes the background of the study, statement of the problem, research questions study, objectives of the study, purpose of the study, research questions, empirical studies, literature review, situation of analysis, situation of analysis based on the proposed research proposal in this application, research methodology, data collection methods and data analysis. This research proposal is aimed at studying of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania particularly in Iringa and Dar es Salaam regions of Tanzania. The research conducted by CCDO aims to support policy makers wishing to assess leadership and decision making strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and evaluate how gender sensitive these responses, assess current practices and policies, identify possible areas for reform, plan for change, and establish mechanisms to monitor progress and evaluate impact.

While in times of pandemic, women and men are affected differently. Failing to take recognize gendered dimensions of the emergency response will exacerbate existing and persisting inequalities and create new ones. This could amplify the crisis and increase its current and future impact for women and girls, and for society as a whole. The Ebola outbreak from 2013 to 2016 and the Zika outbreak in 2015 and 2016 had extensive impacts on women’s lives, in their roles as care providers, family heads, etc; these costs were further amplified as a result of the redeployment of resources away from women’s reproductive health and this sector of the community had limited to no say in policy response.

Twenty-five years after the adoption of the Beijing Platform for Action, gender equality, the progress made in terms of women’s afford setbacks and should not become victims of COVID-19. On the contrary, the response to COVID-19 cannot be deemed efficient and sustainable if it is not built on gender-responsive decisions and actions.

1.1  Background

GENEVA (22 April, 2020) – The UN Women’s rights committee calls on governments and multilateral institutions to ensure women’s equal representation in formulating responses to COVID-19 and strategies to recover from the crisis. The UN Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) has issued detailed guidance on a range of measures that governments should take to uphold women’s rights as they respond to the COVID-19 pandemic. The guidance emphasizes that COVID-19 response and post-crisis recovery plans should promote women’s economic empowerment and address gender inequalities in employment and social protection systems. Moreover, governments must ensure women’s equal and meaningful participation in the formulation of such plans and in decision-making. Other measures in the guidance include addressing women’s increased health risks as primary caregivers for children and sick family members by ensuring early detection and treatment of COVID-19; providing confidential access to sexual and reproductive health services through easy-to-access procedures such as online prescriptions for contraceptives; ensuring continuous education through accessible educational tools; and facilitating access to protection orders and safe shelters for women and girls who are victims or at risk of gender-based violence.

Gbedemah, (2020) of the United Nations Human Rights argued that “we welcome the leadership shown by many women leaders in the present crisis in ensuring effective measures to protect their populations, the Committee would like to hear more women’s voices in rebuilding the economy and society after the pandemic, because of pre-existing gender inequalities and deep-rooted discrimination, the consequences of the current crisis have affected women in a disproportionate manner, while at the same time placing increased responsibilities on women’s shoulders at home, in the health workforce and in other sectors,”. He added that “media reports have shown that incidents of gender-based violence against women and girls have risen due to domestic tensions resulting from confinement, pressure of home schooling and job losses.” The Committee also fears that the restrictive measures can lead to compounded and multiple discrimination against women belonging to disadvantaged and marginalized groups.

While in times of crisis, violence against women and girls increases (Womankind Worldwide (2020). Women are hit harder by economic fallout. Women are placed at increased risk of infection, making up 70% of the global health workforce. No country is immune or unaffected by the ‘shadow pandemic’, the violence and abuse against women and girls that is heightened by security, health and money concerns and worsened by lockdown measures. Police reports from China show that domestic violence tripled during the epidemic there. According to the United Nations Population Fund, every three months of lockdown could result in 15 million more cases of domestic violence than would typically be expected.

Women are bearing the brunt of the economic fallout of the current COVID-19 crisis. As schools and childcare facilities close and health systems are overloaded, care for children and sick relatives largely falls to women who already perform over three quarters of unpaid care and domestic work. Outside of times of crises, this vastly impacts women’s ability to engage in paid work and in times like these, women are often faced with unfair and sometimes impossible choices of giving up paid work to care for children, older people, the sick or people with disabilities. The gender pay gap further compounds the inequality, making it harder for women to meet families’ basic needs.

Women are also more likely to be in precarious and low paid work, providing critical services with no secure income or social protections, such as street vendors or domestic workers. For example, 80% of women across Tanzania rely on day-to-day informal labour to support their families. There is serious concern that these women cannot survive sustained lockdown measures with no savings, resources or land to support them. Lockdown measures threaten not just the income and livelihoods of these women but their very survival (Ibid).

COVID-19 is exasperating existing inequalities and impacting the most marginalized the hardest. For the three billion people in the world without access to running water such as those in the Global South or Indigenous communities, the hand washing advice is seen as a conversation among the privileged. Access to reliable and accessible information itself is not equal, especially for people with disabilities, illiterate people, and people living in rural areas. For example, Womankind partner National Union of Women with Disabilities of Uganda (NUWODU) report that government directives and guidelines are neither inclusive nor considerate of people with disabilities and there have been cases of those with disabilities having been penalized for not adhering to public health restrictions.

Under international human rights law, governments have an obligation to protect the right to freedom of expression, including the right to seek, receive, and impart information of all kinds, regardless of frontiers. Permissible restrictions on freedom of expression for reasons of public health, noted above, may not put in jeopardy the right itself. Governments are responsible for providing information necessary for the protection and promotion of rights, including the right to health. The Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights regards as a “core obligation” providing “education and access to information concerning the main health problems in the community, including methods of preventing and controlling them.” A rights-respecting response to COVID-19 needs to ensure that accurate and up-to-date information about the virus, access to services, service disruptions, and other aspects of the response to the outbreak is readily available and accessible to all.

1.1.0. Objectives of the Study

The general objective of this study shall investigate the factors that affecting women’s participation in leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID pandemic in Tanzania. Specifically, the study aims at:

  1. Assessing the factors that affect women’s participation in parliamentary decision making on response to the COVID-19 in Tanzania.
  2. Establishing the positions women occupy at all levels in the crisis and decision making committees, units or task forces put in place in parliament.
  3. Suggest possible strategies that can enhance women’s equal access and full participation in leadership power structures and decision-making.
  4. Examine the structures and processes which reinforce the subordinate positions of women in leadership and decision strategies consideration /dispensation in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

1.1.1. Research Questions

The proposed study seeks to answer the following questions.

  1. Are both women and men participating in parliamentary decision-making on COVID19?
  2. Are there women participating at all levels in the crisis and decision-making committees, units and/or task forces put in place in parliament?
  3. Do parliamentary committees have a gender equality mandate?
  4. If laws are adopted by parliament to allow the government to take measures to mitigate COVID-19 for people and the economy, do those laws include a call and provisions to ensure that mitigation measures are gender-responsive?
  5. Are women who are caring for the ill and providing other essential services being recognized for their role and fairly compensated, supported and equipped with protective equipment?
  6. Are there strong policies and codes of conduct in place to address the endemic violence against female health workers and sexual harassment in the health and social sectors?
  7. How can MPs reach out to constituents while promoting gender equality and gender responsiveness?
  8. Are media and other communication platforms being used to reach out to constituents to inform them of measures taken to respond to the COVID-19 crisis? Are such initiatives ensuring exchanges with constituents on their experiences and needs, including the specific needs of women and girls?
  9. Are MPs and staff supported in juggling their work and household or family duties, without undue burden related to gendered roles, including by allowing teleworking with flexible hours for both men and women and granting paid leave to both men and women staff who no longer have access to childcare?

1.1.2 Problem Statements

Globally, women make up just 23.3% of parliamentarians. (Inter-Parliamentary Union, 2017), in January 2017, there were 10 women serving as Head of State and 9 as Head of Government. (UN Women calculation based on information provided to Permanent Missions to the United Nations,2020), in June 2016, there were 38 countries in which women make up less than 10% of parliamentarians in single or lower houses, including 4 countries with no women at all in both chambers. (Inter-Parliamentary Union and UN Women, 2016), in January 2015, only 17% of government ministers globally were women. (Inter-Parliamentary Union, 2015), in June 2016, only two countries have 50% or more women in parliament in single or lower houses. 46 single or lower houses were composed of more than 30% women, including 14 in Sub-Saharan Africa and 11 in Latin America. Out of these 46 countries, 40 had applied some form of quotas (Inter-Parliamentary Union and UN Women, 2016).

Violence against women and girls is a global issue with 1 in 3 women across the world experiencing violence (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 2013). Statistics show that the abuser is usually someone the woman knows: 38% of all murdered women are killed by their partner. (London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, 2013), of all women killed globally in 2012, it is estimated that almost half were killed by a partner or relative compared to less than 6% of men (United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, 2014). The vast majority of women across the globe have experienced violence on the streets of their cities with 89% of women in Brazil, 86% in Thailand and 79% in India reporting harassment and abuse (Action Aid, 2016). Moreover, only 18 out of 173 countries have specific legislation addressing sexual harassment in public places (World Bank, 2016). Over 700 million women alive today were married when they were under 18, and of those some 250 million were married before they were 15 (UNICEF, 2014). Around 1 in 10 (120 million) girls worldwide have experienced sexual violence at some point in their lives (UNICEF, 2014). At least 200 million girls and women alive today living in 30 countries have undergone female genital mutilation (UNICEF, 2016). A European Union survey showed that 34% of women with a health problem or disability had experienced violence by a partner in their lifetime, compared to 19% per cent of women without a health problem or disability (European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights, 2014).

However, in parts of Tanzania there is limited access to public health information. For example, health posters are not made accessible for the visually impaired or those who cannot read. Myths about the coronavirus (COVID-19) are already spreading such as its association with ‘sin’ and the disease as divine punishment for ‘sinners’. Young people are relying on social media as a source of information and as such are falling preys to fake news. Children and parents are not receiving education on preventive measures and thus children are playing outside, exposing themselves to the risk of infection. Other challenges have been brought on by the school closures which have increased unpaid care work for women (Tarimo, C. & Wu, J, (2020). Children are now at home and their care and protection is falling onto the women of the household. In some parts of Tanzania, some of the health centres are also lacking in facilities such as ventilators and preventative clothing for staff to prevent transmissions.

In a study of 173 countries 155 have at least one legal difference restricting women’s economic opportunities. Of those, 100 have laws that restrict the types of jobs that women can do, and in 18 husbands can prevent their wives from accepting jobs (World Bank, 2015).

We are extremely concerned by reports of security forces in Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya and Zimbabwe using excessive force including beating, shooting, and arbitrarily detaining people to enforce lockdown measures.

1.1.3. Significance of the Study

Literature on studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania is scanty. There is no sufficient data on the studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic in parliament representation. Twenty-five years after the adoption of the Beijing Platform for Action, gender equality and women’s rights cannot afford setbacks and should not become victims of COVID19. On the contrary, the response to COVID-19 cannot be deemed efficient and sustainable if it is not built on gender-responsive decisions and actions. The significant of this study derives not only from its ability to determine the level of participation of women in leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic but also its examination of the factors that affect women’s effective participation. The fact that the study will place gender equality at the core of the parliamentary response to COVID-19, as parliaments reorganize their means of functioning and adapt their work to the new realities imposed by COVID-19, it is crucial that their decisions and actions be gender responsive. It is hoped that the data gathered from this study would lead to new affirmative action policies that will enhance gender mainstreaming and equal participation in all leadership and development processes. The data will also be resourceful to scholars and policy makers as well as contribute to the inadequate literature on studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic analysis and prevention so as to transform gender-neutral or gender-blind parliamentary adaptation strategies into gender-responsive ones. For policymaking to be as inclusive and efficient as possible, mapping and securing the participation of both men and women is a must.

 

1.1.4 Conceptual Framework

A gender-sensitive parliament is one that responds to the needs and interests of both men and women in its structures, methods and work. The Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) research project is designed to support parliaments’ efforts to become more gender-sensitive institutions and offers a wide range of strategies in eight broad categories areas that can be implemented by all parliaments. This research should help parliaments to evaluate how gender sensitive they are, assess their current practices and policies, identify possible areas for reform, plan for change, and establish mechanisms to monitor progress on response to COVID-19 pandemic analysis and prevention strategies. As parliaments reorganize their means of functioning and adapt their work to the new realities imposed by COVID-19, it is crucial that their decisions and actions be gender responsive.

To begin with, parliaments must acknowledge that they are not a gender-neutral place. They must therefore do some soul-searching through a gender lens. Thus, this research will help to define a gender-sensitive parliament as one in which there are no barriers substantive, structural or cultural to women’s full participation and to equality between its men and women members and staff in response to COVID -19 pandemic prevention strategies. The study will contribute to achieve parliament gender sensitivity by thoroughly reviewing its structures, operations, methods and work so as to ensure they respond to the needs and interests of both men and women.

The proposed research will help to identifies seven key areas for gender-sensitive action: equality in participation, strong legal and policy frameworks, gender mainstreaming tools, gender-sensitive parliamentary infrastructure and culture, women’s and men’s shared responsibility for gender equality, political parties as gender equality champions, and gender-sensitive recruitment and staff development policies in response to COVID-19 pandemic.

This is an ambitious yet indispensable agenda. If parliament is to deliver on the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and in particular on Goal 5 on gender equality and Goal 16 relating to good governance and strong institutions, it must embody gender equality and lead by example. Today’s parliaments know that very well.

This research is designed in response to a growing desire by parliaments around the world to improve the way that they advance gender equality and to be models to the communities they represent on response to COVID-19 outbreak. The research will help parliaments wishing to evaluate how gender sensitive they are, assess their current practices and policies, identify possible areas for reform, plan for change, and establish mechanisms to monitor progress.

The research draws on CCDO’s extensive experience in supporting national parliaments on gender-sensitive reform work. It proposes sets of questions to be tailored to each national context. They are designed to lead to open, constructive discussions. The intention is not to rank parliaments. It is rather to help them identify their strengths and weaknesses in order to determine priorities for strengthening the institution. The parliament will find its own way through this process. But in all cases, the process will require strong leadership and commitment. It must include women and men, ensure everyone is on board, and bring about a change in culture.

The starting point of action on gender-sensitive parliaments is that it should facilitate the work of both men and women and enhance parliaments’ ability to deliver on gender equality, while the research Shall provides a framework for discussion among members of parliament, decision-makers in the parliamentary administration and parliamentary staff. The method involves answering questions about the policy frameworks and work of the parliament concerned on response to COVID-19 outbreak. These questions will be grouped under seven topics:

1)      Presence of women in parliament: number and positions

2)      Legal and policy framework for gender equality

3)      Mechanisms to mainstream gender equality throughout the work of parliament

4)      Infrastructure and policies to support a gender-sensitive culture

5)      Shared responsibility for gender equality among all parliamentarians

6)      Need for political parties to be champions of gender equality

7)      Role of parliamentary staff in supporting gender equality outcomes.

The above arguments will guide this study. African male leaders and particularly those involved in politics have taken advantage of these factors to either conceal or legitimize the perpetuation of those oppressive gender relations on response to COVID-19. While nationalist movements in Tanzania had mobilized both men and women in the struggle for independence, through these factors, power was essentially transformed to men who inherited all the colonial administrative apparatus. Hitherto studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania will be phrased to promote discussion, rather than to extract factual, closed responses. It is hoped that in answering the questions, the group carrying out the self-assessment will engage in serious and systematic discussions on these issues, even if those discussions provoke disagreement.

2.0. Literature Review

The literature on studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania is very scanty. However, a review of related literature from other parts of the world will suffice. The review will be done under eight broad categories. The first category deals with situation analysis of COVID-19 on women leadership and decision making. The second category deals with placing gender equality at the core of the parliamentary response to COVID-19. The third category deals with gender mainstreaming and women’s participation and leadership in parliamentary decision making on COVID-19. The fourth category deals with COVID-19 and gender responsive legislation. The firth category deals with overseeing the government’s COVID-19 response from a gender perspective. The sixth category deals with communicating and raising awareness on COVID-19 and its effects the role of MPs and parliaments. The seventh category deals with gender sensitive parliaments in times of COVID-19. The final category deals with parliamentary action today for a better tomorrow studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic analysis and prevention.

2.1.0 Situation Analysis of COVID-19 on Women Leadership and Decision Making

Women are the mainstay of the essential services needed to withstand and cope with the pandemic. Some 70 per cent of the health workforce caring for those affected is made up of women. Women are also caring for those affected as heads of household and working in grocery stores and pharmacies. This means that women are on the front line and at high risk of infection.

The crisis and some of the measures to contain or respond to it can also put women's lives, health and safety doubly in jeopardy. Violence against women has already reached epidemic proportions in all societies, with 137 women killed every day globally by a member of their own family. The level of domestic violence and sexual exploitation further increases as a result of confined living conditions, economic stress and fear about the virus. We have also learnt from previous epidemics that resources should not be diverted from essential sexual and reproductive health services, otherwise the rights and lives of women and girls are disproportionately impacted in such crisis situations. During the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, more women died of obstetric complications than of the disease itself.

The world is experiencing not only a public health crisis but also an economic crisis. This economic downturn will disproportionately affect women and increase vulnerabilities. Women workers are more likely than men to have the lowest paid and least protected jobs, often in the informal sector (particularly in agriculture, cleaning and catering sectors and domestic work). They are disproportionately excluded from contributory and tax-financed health coverage and from social benefit protections, such as pensions, social insurance, paid sick leave, or parental and care leave. They are most likely to be the first ones to lose income that is crucial for them, their families and their communities and societies at large.

As social distancing and movement restrictions lead to increased use of digital technologies, greater vigilance is required around the fact that women and girls have less access to internet and digital literacy and are more targeted by gender-based online violence. Women leaders – such as women in politics, women human rights defenders, bloggers, journalists, activists, etc. – are at particular risk online. Studies conducted by the Inter-Parliamentary Union (IPU) on violence against women in parliaments have shown that social media are the main channel for threats. With home confinement, school closures and remote work, the household is becoming the central place where domestic, professional and parental responsibilities converge. Will this be an opportunity to better distribute domestic chores and childcare among women and men so that both can continue their professional lives? Or on the contrary will women continue to take on the majority of unpaid domestic and parental tasks to the detriment of their paid work life?.

 

2.1.1 Placing gender equality at the core of the parliamentary response to COVID-19

As parliaments reorganize their means of functioning and adapt their work to the new realities imposed by COVID-19, it is crucial that their decisions and actions be gender responsive. Below are some key issues and questions that – if considered and addressed – could transform gender-neutral or gender-blind parliamentary adaptation strategies into gender-responsive ones.

  1. Are the voices and concerns of women in society included in the deliberations and decisions of parliamentary committees, units and/or task forces on designing and implementing the pandemic response? For example, are women’s organizations, women representatives of labour market sectors, women working in the informal sector, women caring for the ill, etc., being heard and consulted by parliamentary committees and/or task forces, including by using virtual witness testimony via videoconferencing technologies?
  2. If parliament has reduced the number of MPs allowed to sit, are women MPs included among those allowed to sit? Is there a balance between men and women? If not, what is the proportion of women and how can it be enhanced towards equality?
  3. In exercising its oversight functions, is parliament ensuring that there is a balance between men and women or proportions as close as possible to 50/50 in the task forces and other mechanisms created on COVID-19 at the State/Executive level?
  4. If some parliamentary committees are still meeting, including remotely, are gender equality committees meeting and contributing to all mitigation strategies from a gender perspective?
  5. If new special parliamentary committees are created to scrutinize the government’s COVID-19 response, is scrutiny from a gender perspective included in their functions? Do they have the necessary capacities and resources to implement gender responsiveness?

2.1.2 Gender mainstreaming and women’s participation and leadership in parliamentary decision-making on COVID-19

For policymaking to be as inclusive and efficient as possible, mapping and securing the participation of both men and women is a must. At a time when parliaments and their structures are meeting in a reduced capacity, often with a reduced number of members, it is vital to secure the participation of women at all levels and their leadership in the decision-making and oversight committees, units and/or task forces put in place in parliament to respond to the crisis. Equal participation of men and women, women’s leadership and a clear gender-mainstreaming mandate are key to ensure the inclusivity and efficiency of such parliamentary mechanisms.

Just as important is the inclusion of women’s voices and the contribution of women’s organizations, women representatives of labour market sectors, women working in the informal sector, women caring for the ill, and so on, in all parliamentary deliberations during the COVID-19 crisis: to this end, virtual witness testimony via videoconferencing technologies, among other methods, would be a useful contribution.

Continued functioning of existing gender equality committees and the inclusion of gender equality in the mandate of new special parliamentary committees set up to scrutinize the government’s COVID-19 response are also essential to guarantee an accountable institutional commitment to gender mainstreaming and, ultimately, an efficient parliamentary response to the pandemic. Key questions to consider:

1)      If parliament has reduced the number of MPs allowed to sit, are women MPs included among those allowed to sit? Is there a balance between men and women? If not, what is the proportion of women and how can it be enhanced towards equality?

2)      In exercising its oversight functions, is parliament ensuring that there is a balance between men and women or proportions as close as possible to 50/50 in the task forces and other mechanisms created on COVID-19 at the State/Executive level?

3)      Are the voices and concerns of women in society included in the deliberations and decisions of parliamentary committees, units and/or task forces on designing and implementing the pandemic response? For example, are women’s organizations, women representatives of labour market sectors, women working in the informal sector, women caring for the ill, etc., being heard and consulted by parliamentary committees and/or task forces, including by using virtual witness testimony via videoconferencing technologies?

4)      If some parliamentary committees are still meeting, including remotely, are gender equality committees meeting and contributing to all mitigation strategies from a gender perspective?

5)      If new special parliamentary committees are created to scrutinize the government’s COVID-19 response, is scrutiny from a gender perspective included in their functions? Do they have the necessary capacities and resources to implement gender responsiveness?

2.1.3 COVID-19 and gender-responsive legislation

Laws adopted by parliament to allow the government to take measures to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 should be gender-responsive. Emergency assistance measures for the health and economy sectors, hospitals, doctors, workers, small businesses, the self-employed, families, and the socially disadvantaged must be informed by sex disaggregated data, building on a gender-based analysis of the situation. A detailed understanding of rates of infection and mortality among men and among women, for example, or information on who are the main beneficiaries of economic measures taken to respond to the crisis will help better shape policies and laws such that they efficiently address the needs of both men and women. Key questions to consider:

  1. If emergency assistance measures for the health and economy sectors, hospitals, doctors, workers, small businesses, the self-employed, families, and the socially disadvantaged are taken, are they being designed based on sex disaggregated data and are they responsive to the specific needs of women?
  2. When adopting legislation or amending standing orders to allow essential parliamentary work to be pursued, do adaptation measures take into account the specific situation and needs of women members of parliament and staff?

2.1.4 Overseeing the government’s COVID-19 response from a gender perspective

As mentioned above, structures set up to oversee government action during the crisis need to be gender-sensitive in their composition, mandate and working methods. Gender-responsive oversight will achieve a more effective review of the impact of actions taken, as analysing policy, measures, programmes and spending through a gender lens will help address the needs of women and men without discrimination. Key questions to consider:

1)      Are resources being diverted from life-saving health-care services for women, including safe maternal and newborn care, and access to contraception and other reproductive health services?

2)      What is being done for the most vulnerable women to ensure they can access food, water, and information and health services?

3)      Is specific financial support being provided to sectors that may not benefit from social protection and unemployment benefits, such as the informal sector?

4)      With the increased risk of domestic violence, what is being done to ensure that women have access to protection, resources and shelters as essential services? What is being done to curb the impact of the outbreak on support services for survivors, particularly health-care, police and justice services? How can women facing domestic violence call for help or escape when full time at home with violent partners? Have concrete actions to protect women survivors of violence and respond to their needs been adapted and included in the emergency measures against the pandemic?

5)      With schools closed, what measures have been taken to protect girls at risk of sexual violence?

2.1.5 Communicating and raising awareness on COVID 19 and its effects the role of MPs and parliaments

Media and other communication platforms are being used to reach out to constituents to inform them of measures taken to respond to the COVID-19 crisis. Such initiatives also facilitate exchanges with constituents on their experiences and needs and can serve to identify the specific needs of women and girls. Awareness-raising that focuses on social distancing and hygiene measures should draw attention to the importance of sharing care responsibilities equally between women and men. Male MPs in particular can highlight how important it is that men and women share household and care responsibilities equally. Speaking out in the media and on other platforms on the crucial role that women are playing in responding to the health emergency, maintaining basic services and supporting families raises awareness of and strengthens solidarity with and support to women in their essential roles. Key questions to consider:

1)      Is virtual outreach to community organizations, such as health centres, food banks and women’s shelters, being used to identify the support required?

2)      If public awareness-raising on social distancing and hygiene measures is being conducted by parliamentary leadership and MPs, are they also raising awareness of the importance of sharing care responsibilities equally between women and men? Are male MPs highlighting how important it is that men and women share household and care responsibilities equally?

3)      Are parliament and MPs highlighting in the media and other platforms the crucial role that women are playing in responding to the health emergency, maintaining basic services and supporting families, so as to build awareness of the need to demonstrate solidarity towards them and support them in their essential roles?

2.1.6 Gender-sensitive parliaments in times of COVID-19

In times of crisis, parliaments are crafting new ways of working, adapting to the new reality. In this context, measures taken can gain efficiency by integrating a gender perspective from the very beginning. Parliaments in times of crisis cannot ignore gender equality. On the contrary, the crisis can and should be an opportunity to fasttrack decisions, processes and working methods that are conducive for parliament to remain, be or become a gender-sensitive institution. Key questions to consider:

1)      In these extraordinary times, are MPs and staff supported in juggling their work and household or family duties, without undue burden related to gendered roles, including by allowing teleworking with flexible hours for both men and women and granting paid leave to both men and women staff who no longer have access to childcare?

2)      Are adequate resources, knowledge-sharing and equipment allocated to facilitate teleworking for all MPs and staff so that men and women alike can pursue their work in the best way possible?

3)      Are all meetings, including virtual meetings, taking place during office hours?

4)      Is pay for all staff guaranteed, including non-salaried staff who has been asked to stay home or staff considered vulnerable to COVID-19 who should stay home because of age or medical conditions?

5)      Is support and guidance offered to MPs and staff on how to make safe use of digital technology in their work, including in cases of online violence, to which women are more exposed?

 

2.1.7 Parliamentary action today for a better tomorrow

The current COVID-19 crisis brings great challenges, but it may also open windows of opportunity to address and redress existing imbalances and inequalities and build fairer and more resilient societies in the long run. Therefore, this research will be beneficial to the studies of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic by doing the following:

1)      By strengthening gender-mainstreaming capacity in parliament now, good practice will not only have a positive impact on decisions taken and measures designed today but will also become the way in which parliamentary business is conducted in the future.

2)      Setting up a monitoring system to document the measures taken within parliament will feed into post-COVID deliberations and decisions on how parliaments can continue to function in a gender-sensitive and gender responsive way at all times.

3)      If parliaments contribute now to ensuring health coverage for all, in line with the IPU resolution on universal health coverage, this will have long-lasting benefits for all, today and in the future.

4)      If parliaments take the opportunity now to challenge existing stereotypes and the traditional division of work within households and in the economy, this will support the economic empowerment of women and girls for years and generations to come.

5)      Documenting now the essential role of women in the crisis response, in society and in the economy, will help ensure that these roles are more systematically acknowledged and taken into account in the future. This will feed into the necessary cultural shift towards gender equality.

3.0 Research Intervention Activities

Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) in Tanzania is planning to work with people living in poverty, especially women and young people. Planned research activities include:

  • Raising awareness of COVID-19 in communities and to frontline service providers
  • Providing hygiene kits to women-led response committees
  • Training women’s rights organization members to produce locally-made face masks.
  • Advocating for the involvement of women and young people.
  • Identify possible areas for constitution reform
  • Define a gender sensitive parliament
  • Developing questionnaire and distribution
  • Conduct workshops
  • Identification of knowledge gaps
  • Collecting coronavirus blood samples and testing
  • Collecting traditional herbs for COVID-19 treatment and testing

4.0. Research Methodology

4.1.0. Research Design

The study will employ three types of research design, namely: explorative, descriptive, and survey. Explorative design has partly been utilized in the introductory part of the proposal and literature review. The design has also been used to formulate the objectives and research questions. This design will further be used to clarify the phenomena by studying of leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Tanzania. Descriptive design will be used to analyze the data. It will be used to describe the characteristics of women who are currently engaged in leadership and decision strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and those who have failed in political turbulence. Survey design will be used in the research instruments such as questionnaires, interview schedules and focus group discussions (FGDs).

4.1.1. Area and Scope of Study

The study will be conducted in the four provinces and constituencies namely Iringa and Dar es Salaam Regions of Tanzania. It will also focus on political parties, Medical Women Association of Tanzania (MEWATA), lobby groups, Medical Association of Tanzania, National Assembly of Tanzania, the Council of Councilors at District level, and coalitions. These will provide an excellent field laboratory since they engage in issues that affect women in leadership and decision making strategies. Based on the 2015 level of women participation in electoral politics results, it is appropriate that the following provinces and their respective constituencies be selected for the study:

4.1.2. Sampling Procedure

From the 15 provinces in Iringa and Dar es Salaam regions in Tanzania, 4 provinces have been purposively selected on the basis of level of women participation in leadership and decision making strategies. On the same basis, one constituency in each province is selected. In each constituency, the study population will consist of people who have been, or are actively engaged in leadership and decision strategies, traditional birth attendants, traditional healers, medical laboratory technicians, and electoral politics before, during, or after elections. The following categories of samples will be considered for the study:

Category One: Consists of political parties, lobby groups and coalitions. A list of registered political parties will be obtained from the registrar of societies. Purposive sampling will be employed to select political parties with higher number of women participants. Offices of these parties will be visited. Offices of the leading women’s political groups such as the Tanzania Gender Networking Programme (TGNP),Umoja wa Wanawake Tanzania (UWT), Tanzania Media Women’s Association (TAMWA), Tanzania Women Judges Association (TWJA), Medical Association of Tanzania (MAT), National Assembly of Tanzania, the Council of Councilors, and Medical Women’s Association of Tanzania (MEWATA), will be also visited. In this category data will be gathered to establish the efforts made to actively involve women in leadership and decision making strategies in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Category Two: Entails women who have taken part as candidates for both civic and parliamentary seats, and their chief campaigners. The category will yield crucial data on the challenges women face first because of being women and second being politicians.

4.1.3. Data Collection Methods

In field research, the study will triangulate a number of data collection methods: self-administered questionnaires, interviews, and FGDs (Gilbert, M, Pullano, G, Pinotti, G, et al. (2020) . The researcher will engage four field assistants, one per every constituency considered. Interviews will be recorded in audio tapes. With regard to library research, relevant libraries and documentation/resource centres will be visited. Internet search will also be done to gather relevant data. Sources of data are expected to come from the list of men and women members of parliament (currently and in the recent past); list of men and women in positions of parliamentary leadership in the bureau or board (currently and in the recent past); list of committee membership, by sex, including positions of leadership (chairperson, deputy, other office bearers); list of parliamentary staff, by sex, including positions of leadership; standing orders/internal rules of the parliament; any laws relating to gender equality passed by the parliament in at least the past five years; the constitution and the national electoral law; any existing national action plan on gender equality; list of men and women in leadership positions in the major political parties; any government and opposition parties’ policies or programmes concerning gender equality; any policies of the parliament that have an impact on gender equality (e.g. code of conduct, anti-discrimination policies, communications strategy); the parliament’s strategic plan, or other plans of action; any indication of parliament’s involvement in United Nations gender equality mechanisms, such as national reports tabled in parliament for submission to the Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women; parliamentary debates held on those reports; and participation of parliamentarians at the Committee’s sessions or at the annual Commission on the Status of Women.

4.1.4. Data Analysis

Data recorded in other languages will be translated into English. Information recorded in audio tapes will be transcribed. Field data will be analyzed and integrated with secondary data, then thematically organized according to the objectives of the study. Through this organization, chapters of the report will be drawn. Qualitative and quantitative methods of data analysis will be applied. Descriptive and analytical methods will be used to present the data in various chapters of the report. In the report, documentary data will be organized and presented in the form of tables and percentages.

4.1.5 Reporting

The research will be current and available on Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) website, social media. Each step made in implementing activities of the research will be posted va various channels and shared as much as possible. CCDO Public Relation team will be active in documenting of all undertakings and posting series of events per day, week, monthly, quarterly and yearly. The donor will be given links so as to follow in each post made. Furthermore, a representative given by the project donor will be allowed to access the documents of the activities in collaboration with CCDO Public team.

Three months from the starting day of the research, the project team and leaders will prepare an official report which will be brought to the donor as a draft for comments and further capture the comments before officially published. The published year report will be shared in both hard and soft copies to various stakeholders including CCDO Members and all friends of CCDO. Special acknowledgment page for the donor will be an important content of the report.

Each financial records will be shared openly with the African Academy of Social Science donor on how every and each single cent have been spent in the research project also the Auditor’s report will be shared to the responsible the project donor which supported the research project.

4.1.6 Financial Management and Accountability

To ensure financial accountability, all transactions related to the research project will be well documented and reported to the donors within 30 days from the date the project commencement. All Proforma Invoices with their EFD receipts will be shared to the donor. Also to ensure the efficiency of the research, a Memorandum of Understanding shall be settled down between the project donor and CCDO counterpart. Acknowledgment of receiving funds will be provided as where and when the research project is debited all materials received from donor will be valued and receipt voucher will be provided to acknowledge the support. To easier the proper management of research project funds CCDO will be responsible to open a separate research account for the better achievement of the research intended goals.

4.1.7 Ethical Considerations

The research project will be entirely run by the Children Care Development Organization (CCDO). The CCDO policies shall be adhered in running the research project. CCDO methods will be the only methodologies of implementing the research activities. Interests of the project donor will be respected and maximum cooperation will be provided by all research participants. Violation of organization policies will not have a chance during the research project.

5.0. Conclusions

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights states that everyone has the right to take part in the government of her or his country regardless of sex, race, ethnicity, religion or creed. Since women constitute over 50 per cent of the population in Tanzania, their equal right of access to leadership and decision strategies needs to be emphasized. Achieving the goal of equal participation of women and men in decision-making positions will provide a balance which more accurately reflects the composition of the society, interests and the general good of all citizens. The diversity of perspectives and experiences with regard to gender is highly valued as part of national development in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, where women are under-represented in activities within political and health leadership, emphasizing a gender equality perspective is necessary.

 

Dear friends,

If coronavirus sweeps across Asia, Africa, and South America next, MILLIONS could die… because in many countries, people simply can't afford to stay home or get the basic health care they need! But G20 leaders are meeting today -- if we urge them to forgive the debt of the world’s poorest nations, we can ensure these countries use this precious money to save lives right now! Once 1 million join, we’ll plaster our call across leading newspapers. Donate now to help the Tanzanian children and women suffering from those pandemic, the donated money will help them to buy sanitize medicine, mask and related coronavirus awareness education and coronavirus prevention measures.

Your donation can be send to our M-Pesa account +255754813368

For further details please send email to childrencareorg1@gmail.com

Read more;
This is a terrifying time for us all, but it could get much, much worse.

If coronavirus takes over some of the world’s poorest countries in Asia, Africa, and South America, MILLIONS of people could die.

People crammed into slums, overcrowded hospitals, little money to help the poor. In many of these places, people simply can't afford to stay home or get the basic health care they need!

But G20 leaders are meeting today to work out a global response to this crisis. Experts are asking them to offer debt relief to the world’s poorest countries, allowing that precious money to save lives. That’s exactly what is needed right now, and it’s on us to ensure our leaders make it happen!

Let’s join this global call to contain this deadly wave -- when 1 million sign, we’ll plaster our call across leading newspapers. Sign now!

G20: Forgive the debt of the world’s poorest to fight coronavirus

Poor countries worldwide are saddled with billions of dollars in debt to rich countries and institutions like the IMF. But right now, it makes much more sense for them to inject this cash into their healthcare systems and to help their people stay at home so we can stop this virus spreading.

Tanzania, Pakistan and Ethiopia have already called for debt relief, and even the World Bank has asked G20 leaders to offer debt relief to the world’s poorest countries so they can spend their precious resources on the coronavirus pandemic.

Leaders have agreed to this before, but it took huge public pressure. In 2005, G8 finance ministers cancelled the debt of the world’s 18 most heavily indebted countries to the amount of $40 billion! And after Ebola, the IMF cancelled $100m of debt for the world’s worst-hit places.

So, let’s make this call massive, before it’s too late! This is a global crisis and we’ll only beat it if countries everywhere can contain the virus. Sign now and let’s urge G20 leaders to urgently forgive debt and save lives!

G20: Forgive the debt of the world’s poorest to fight coronavirus

Tragedy can birth some of the most beautiful moments of our time, but only if we take this time to join hands. After World War II, major powers wrote off most of Germany’s debt and the United Nations was created for international peacekeeping. We can create something visionary from this crisis, but we need to urge our world leaders to rise and be the heroes this moment needs. Let’s do it together.

With hope and determination,

Sarah, Alaphia, Christoph, Alice, Diego, Risalat, Oscar, Nell, Bert, Majaliwa and the rest of the Avaaz team.

More information:

The Next Wave (Foreign Policy)
https://foreignpolicy.com/2020/03/23/coronavirus-hitting-developing-countries-war-zones-united-nations-urgent-donation-appeal-syria-gaza-yemen-south-sudanthe-next-wave/

Bill Gates warns of 10 million deaths as Coronavirus spreads to Africa (The Daily Telegraph)
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/02/15/coronovirus-bill-gates-warns-10-million-deaths-virus-spreads/

Urgent call to head off new debt crisis in developing world (The Guardian)
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/22/urgent-call-to-head-off-new-debt-crisis-in-developing-world

World Bank, IMF urge debt relief for poorest countries
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-world-bank-imf/world-bank-imf-urge-debt-relief-for-poorest-countries-idUSKBN21C2G0

 

Key Success Story for the CCDO

Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) is an NGO, based in Iringa City – Tanzania, whose mission is to identify current development issues and development best practices on the ground and to make this knowledge available to development organizations and local and national responsible bodies in order to highlight and alleviate the problems at a community level.

The CCDO vision is to improve the living standards of misery rural households through education, entrepreneurs, self-reliant participatory efforts of members of those households and vocational training in the areas of carpentry, tailoring and embroidery, welding, metal works, motor mechanics and garage activities. While our CCDO mission is to strengthen local community competency to the promotion of education, primary health care and development to deprived members of the societies through capacity building, provision of handcraft industries and vocational training to impaired children, poverty reduction, promoting human rights and advocacy skills, community mobilization skills, and mitigation of the socio-economic impact of HIV/AIDS in selected communities in Tanzania.

CCDO objective was to establish a school that will offer education for misery children from Pre-primary and Primary School in Iringa town of Iringa Region in Tanzania and to expand project in other local districts in Tanzania and across East and Central African Countries, as well as to ensure that misery rural men and women adopt the culture of saving and are able to invest in and manage viable income generating activities, and support community outreach work, disabled children, orphans, widows, youth groups and women’s empowerment through capacity building.

Since its inception we have managed to promote and increase women awareness on good governance, and also we conducted capacity Building in the field of youth Agreement for Refugee Integration through Dignity, Health and Employability’ (RITDHE). The project included the following international organizations Catalyst in Communities (CICUK); DRAMBLYS (DRAM); Artemisszio Foundation (AF); InterMedia KT(ITMK); Institute for Training of Personnel in International Organisations (ITPIO); Istitutodei Sordi di Torino (IST); Children Care Organisation (CCDO); Southern African Refugee Project (SAY) from the EU Members , South Africa and Tanzania under support from the Le Menanch Foundation (LMF) in United Kingdom.

However, we thank for our God for all He is blessing the CCDO and our loved community members including our NGO partners. For the strengthen us to give each day and for all the people around us who make life more meaningful. We thank our God for enabling us to construct our own school known as Peace Flame Pre and Primary School at Nduli village within Iringa Iringa City of Iringa Region in Tanzania. Now we have Pupils from Kindergarten up to Standard Five (5). This is an English Medium School for our street children and orphans, while pupils from rich families are encouraged to join at our school just to enable our school to be sustainable in cash follow and let us to afford to feed our most vulnerable children known as orphans. Therefore, it is part of our faith as a CCDO to try to help those who are suffering from poverty or economic / political injustice as the Great American Philosopher Abraham Lincoln who said that “to care4 for those, who shall have borne the battle and for their families and survivors”, similarly to the messenger of Allah, said “one who strives to help a widow or the poor is like one who struggles in the cause of Allah” Sahid Muslim.

Furthermore, the Biblical interpretation regarding the work of CCDO on orphans and widows stated that” the Lord watches over the Sojourners; he upholds the widow and the fatherless, but the way of wicked he brings to ruin (Psalm 146:9).

Please we are appealing individuals, development agencies, charities organizations, NGOs, local governments, researcher’s institutions, universities, public and private sector to join us to find together a long term development challenges in this development case study (DCS) as describes below.

In spite of the efforts of CCDO above, there are still many unmet needs in Iringa. With additional funding CCDO will be able to expand and improve its services to the community, including:

1)      Providing Healthcare to OVCs/ MVCs and PLWHAs

2)      Providing healthcare and clean water education

3)      Ensuring that 250 OVCs /MVCs Complete Basic Education

4)      Providing OVCs/ MVCs with Adequate and Secure Shelter

5)      Improving the Psychosocial Well-Being of 250/MVCs/ OVCs and 1500 PLWHAs

6)      Improving the Nutritional Status and Food Security of OVCs/MVCs and PLWHAs

7)      Fighting Social Stigma and Improving Legal Rights of OVCs/ MVCs and PLWHAs

8)      Providing Home-Based Care services since Home-based care

 

Your donation money will help us to implement the following activities;

a) Education and vocational training.

1)      School enrolment

2)      Payment of school levies for early childhood development

3)      Provision of school uniforms

4)      Provision of scholastic materials

5)      Visits to schools to promote school retention

6)      Access to vocational training and apprenticeship

7)      Provide financial support for OVC/MVC vocational training.

b) Healthcare and Sanitation:

1)      Prevention, e.g. immunization, health education, environmental sanitation, personal hygiene promotion.

2)      Referral of children and their caregivers to appropriate health service providers.

3)      Promoting the health seeking behavior of the household.

4)      Provision of sanitary towels to mature girls.

5)      Community and Home based care

6)      Awareness creation towards improved health standards.

c) Shelter and care.

1)      Every child must have an adult caregiver

2)      Provision of care to children enrolled in the program.

3)      Support to child headed households.

4)      Provision of clothing, bedding, mosquito nets to OVC.

5)      Shelter renovation

d) Life-skills and HIV prevention for school children.

1)      HIV/AIDS awareness creation and sensitization geared towards behavior change.

2)      Peer education in school

3)      Working with community/women groups in creating HIV/AIDS awareness and providing Community and Home based care to people living with AIDS.

4)      Provide financial support for OVC vocational training.

e) Psychosocial support.

1)      Counseling

2)      Life skills

3)      Recreation

4)      Family fun days

5)      Parenting and caregiver support

6)      Home visits by care providers

7)      Stigma reduction

f) . Food Security and Nutrition.

g) Child Protection.

1)      Protecting the children from all forms of abuses e.g. sexual abuse and exploitation.

2)      Ensure the well being of the child by ensuring that the OVC/MVC have food, shelter, access to health services and school.

3)      Provide counseling to OVC/MVC and guardians.

4)      Ensure nutrition for the OVC/MVC.

5)      Care for the chronically ill guardians to delay orphaning of the children.

6)      Provide spiritual counseling to OVC/MVC.

7)      Prepare the children for death of their parents (will writing, identify foster parents, develop memory books)

8)      Mobilize resources to support OVC/MVC.

9)      Train guardians on OVC /MVC care.

10)  Assisting with birth registration and

11)  Inheritance claims.

h) Economic Strengthening.

1)      Skills building for care givers

2)      Income generation activities

3)      Employment creation initiatives

4)      Small business promotion

5)      Savings and internal lending to communities

6)      Linkages with other community economic promotion initiatives e.g. table banking and grants.

In partnership with the Community groups, the CCDO team will:

1)      Facilitate the supervision and monitoring of the project and will report on the progress according to agreed indicators.

2)      Monitor community performance, including financial management, according to agreed indicators and schedule

3)      Document the assistance provided to OVC/MVC.

4)      Facilitate monthly community-monitoring meetings to ensure accountability

5)      CCDO staff will prepare a human-interest story with photos illustrating the difference that OVC/MVC support has made in the lives of an orphan or highly vulnerable child and her/ his family.

The CCDO gives the chance to academics, Aid development workers, people who are interested in human development problem as well as people who are interested in working in the development arena to work in the field to help the local communities know and understand which human development challenges they are facing. Therefore, we welcome international volunteers to come to volunteer to work with us. The CCDO will help the volunteers interested to come to support us in the Post of teaching English and science subjects, Administrative Managerial Post, Project Writing Post and Research Post. The CCDO will offer free houses and security guards at their house while also we will help them in applying for their working permits from our President’s Office in Dar es Salaam.

Also we will be very happy to the volunteer who can help us to get the used school bus for our school , because now days we have 2 School Hiace (min bus), but they are unable to tackle our challenges of carrying out more pupils during the morning and evening time when we return back our pupils to their homes. We are in high need to get a big used bus (School Coaster0, we prefer to Toyota – school coaster) which can meet our current challenges.

Any donation to the CCDO can be channel through:

1)      Our email: childrencareorg1@gmail.com

2)      WhatsAp +255754813368

3)      M-Pesa +255754813368

Announcement for the post of Project Manager Volunteer and English Teachers Volunteers

The Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) is a non-governmental organization (NGO) operating in Tanzania to empowering the street children and girls living under poverty, diseases, illiterate, underemployment and under technology through Vocational training (carpentry, tailoring and ICT). We have constructed and registered our own Peace Flame Pre and Primary School which is located at Nduli village within Iringa Municipality of Region in Tanzania. We have mobilized workshop tools for carpentry, tailoring and sweater machines, and computers. The school is going and we have pupils from kindergarten to Standard Five (5). This is English Medium School.

The requested Project Co-ordinator volunteer will help to run the following projects:

1)      Running Peace Flame Pre and Primary School.

2)      Mobilization of midwives kits and medical laboratory equipment for our constructed Peace Flame Health Research Centre

3)      Street children Vocational Training Project

4)      Youth sport for Social Change Project

The goal of promoting sport for social change project is to adapt the Sport for social change model to focus on deprived and talented youths, youth with disabilities, at risk youth, and young women, specifically it aims to: To change the undesirable condition of street children and girls working on the streets and cannot obtain formal education, to a desirable condition where street children and girls have a safe place to develop, to support underserved youth to develop important leadership skills, achieve academic success, promote tolerance and respect for diversity, and positively contribute to their communities while the project will be working also to address poverty amongst 20000 disadvantaged people in Tanzania. The specific goal is to promote and reintegration children and youth into the school system included non-formal education, public school system and vocational training skills and to promote the awareness and poverty reduction of the population in the poor community of Iringa, Dar es Salaam, Mbeya and Mbinga District Council and it is also to promote risk reduction of sexual harassment, trafficking and violence related crimes, drug abuse/alcohol related crime, STD, HIV/AIDS and drug use among all vulnerable target population. And make the sustainability of the education program in forward process with linking network and cooperation with all level of stakeholders, NGOs, CBOs, and FBOs.

CCDO goal is to work with local community leaders to identify street children and girls by using sport for social change method in order to obtain the following expected results and outputs ; children and youth in the target community of Iringa, Dar es Salaam, Mbeya, and Mbinga District Council in Ruvuma region, created Youth Network in project cities will be actively involved in the education program and other supports; Non-formal education is provided to ignorance children and disadvantage children and youth within the poor community in the target areas and reintegrating into the public school system. The education program will reach out to the poor community at the countryside and provides education and information as non-formal and formal action; Disadvantage children and youth in the target community will received life skill education in their communities; Children infected and children affected by HIV/AIDS and drug use will be supported for schooling system and, medical health care and other social services; Vocational training skills will be accessed for all forms to disadvantaged children and youth within the target communities in those provinces; Child right protection will be organized for community children and street children in order to prevent them all forms of any abuses; The human right non-formal classes will be organized for protecting any abuses in the poor communities of the target population and the awareness of right will be trained to the target population.

a)      Wider audience benefiting from program(s) (overall impact)

This project will target deprived and talented youth, youth with disabilities, children affected and children infected by HIV/AIDS, disadvantaged children and youth in community, street children / youth, sex worker / entertainment sex worker /MSM, people living with HIV/AIDS, and poor family in poor community, all these target groups will be the final beneficiaries in this project.

b)     Anticipated results (short and long-term)

Short-term result:

1)      To create a safe place for 100 girls from the ages 13 to 15 years old to develop themselves and gain self-awareness, and stay away from the streets.

2)      To provide alternatives to working on the street, for 100 girls, that will promote skill building and to provide income generating activities.

3)      To provide income generating alternatives to 100 girls‟ mothers who are widowed.

4)      To provide vocational training skills for 3500 street children and 250 deaf girls within the target communities in those provinces.

5)      Enhanced community awareness on drug abuse, conflict violence, human trafficking, domestic violence, human rights and democracy governance, diplomacy reciprocal exchange experience and information sharing, community sexual harassment related crimes.

Long-term Result Year 1 and 2

1)      To take girls working on the streets and provide them and their widowed mothers with productive, healthy, meaningful opportunities.

2)      To provide vocational training and employability skills to 3500 street children 250 deaf girls

3)      To organize street children and girls right protection for community children and street children in order to prevent them all forms of any abuses.

4)      To organize human right non-formal classes for protecting any abuses in the poor communities of the target population and the awareness of right will be trained to the target population.

5)      Enhanced community awareness on drug abuse, conflict violence, human trafficking, domestic violence, human rights and democracy governance, diplomacy reciprocal exchange experience and information sharing.

6)      Increased employment opportunity awareness on vocational training and sport development activities.

7)      To encourage the spirit of competition and especially self-challenge in all participants, whose their spirit will build strong personalities in each one of them..

8)      The coming together of deprived and talented youth, youth with disabilities and young women will foster friendship ties and encourage national integration that is indispensable in national unity and national building.

Intermediate Result Year 1 and 2

1)      To provide girls skills in operating a business by becoming part of a value chain as suppliers of goods with a fair trade business. To have the girls engage in sport activities that will promote innovative thinking and business planning developments.

2)      To have same the 100 girls participate in this 2 sport for social change project.

3)      To have accurate and current records of all the girl’s progress and attendance at all times

4)      To have 100 widowed women borrow a micro-loan and start their own microenterprise to become suppliers in a value chain for a for-profit business.

5)      To create awareness of the causes of the HIV/AIDS epidemic and how to protect oneself against the disease

6)      To increase self-confidence and self-awareness in the girls.

7)      A safe place for the street children

8)      To provide income generating alternatives to 100 families

9)      To have 3500 street children and 2500 deaf participate in this vocational training skills

10)  More alternatives for the street children

11)  To create awareness on human rights promotion and war against drug abuse, conflict violence, domestic violence, terrorism and sexual harassment related crimes 

Therefore, the CCDO will be very happy to receive any volunteer interested to come to work with us based on the mentioned project above. Note that there shall be no charges to our accepted volunteers to the CCDO. But the volunteer will be told to pay $130USD per each month as a part of house cost sharing for water and electricity bills including cleanness based on their house. During the weekend days there shall be a vehicle for volunteers interested to drive to Ruaha National Park just for their entertainment based on their wishes. But they will need to use their own fuel only.

For any volunteer interested to come to work with us , he/she can send application directly to this email: childrencareorg1@gmail.com 

 

Re: Erasmus+ Programme: Capacity Building in the field of youth Agreement

2017-3453/001-001: Refugee Integration through Dignity, Health and Employability’ (RITDHE)

P1 – Le Menach Foundation (LMF) Ingrid Stellmacher; P2Catalyst in Communities (CICUK) (represented by Breda Leyne ESquared);P3 – DRAMBLYS (DRAM) Amaia, Maite; P4 – Artemisszio Foundation (AF) Saba Tesfay; P5 – InterMediaKT (ITMK) Greg Archmiandritis, Panos Antonela Kotoni, Nicos; P6 – Institute for Training of Personnel in International Organisations (ITPIO)AtanasBoshkov; P7 - IstitutodeiSordi di Torino (IST) Andre Karl; P8 - Children Care Organisation (CCDO) Rueben Mwabisa Tula ; P 9 - Southern African Refugee Project (SAY) Neftaly M and Clifford

Slide1

2ndTRANSNATIONAL MEETING26th-27th September2018

Patras, Greece                                                  Meeting Notes -Decisions and Actions

RITDHE – Project update and financial status

LMF - Ms Ingrid Stellmacher and P2. CIC (UK)– Ms Breda Leyne (ESquared)

Ingrid explained the discussions with EU project managers in Brussels following interim report submitted July 2018.

Although the project was only envisaged to be 12 months with the late start it has been granted an extension of one year so actual completion date is September 2019.

With some degree of backwards and forwards Ingrid, supported by Breda from ESquared, has reported on the project spends using the EU template and the EU released a second tranche of money. It is however apparent that there is some underspend on the Mobility activity, and on travel component of both mobility and capacity (TNM).

Ingrid was asked by the EU project officers to be more specific as to what activities/costs fell under the money allocated for the intellectual outputs (described in budget under section 3. Breda has produced a document which teases out the activities described in the project workplan and illustrates what kinds of expenses can be claimed against these headings using the guidance document on the beneficiaries area of the EU site. All payments must be made to third parties, no claims can be made of partner staff costs.

Breda met with each partner to explain the logic behind the document and what would need to be evidenced by each partner for final reporting. Some of the money allocated as first tranche will have been spent against piloting for example so costs will have to be shown against those activities.

Decision: What is clearly available to spend is the money allocated for the intellectual outputs (described in budget under section 3 as Production, Translation and Dissemination). Partners need to report their spending against this and use any further allocation against this budget heading.

Action: Breda will provide reporting spreadsheets to assist partners in tracking expenditure against agreed categories.

Action: Breda will finalise what remains to be paid in budget instalments once the deductions for underspend are factored in and will notify all partners of expected instalments. Money will have to be held back as there is likely to be some repayment at the end of the project if all monies cannot be accounted for.

Action: Ingrid will issue Contract amendments

Action: Once partners have finally review proposals and their own spending to date Ingrid will pay next instalment.

PROJECT EXTENSION -

FIRST REFLECTIONS ON PLANNING FURTHER ACTIVITY + TIMELINEREVIEW

Timeline issued June 2018 required all partners to complete Dignity Diaries by 30th September 2018 and to commence pilot activity by 1st September 2018. Following the emailed announcement of the extra time the timeline has been relaxed and new milestones were discussed at the meeting:

  • Completion of Dignity Diaries- February 2019
  • Completion of Pilot activities- February 2019
  • Further Mobility Event (if amendment granted) May2019
  • Final Dissemination Event Thursday 20th June 2019

Decision: As some partners have achieved the original milestones the remaining priorities for activity against the original one year workplan will differ. Some partners would like to repeat training activities or pilots, others have yet to complete first capacity building training or pilot activities. Partners all need to discuss within their own organisations what their priorities will be once required amendments to budget indicate what funding is available to each partner.

Decision: All partners agreed that the extra time allowed for more consideration on dissemination activity both locally and as a co-ordinated activity (led by IMKT)

Action: Each partner to consider outline plans for activity from October 2018-September 2019.

Decision: The partners will plan a further submission for KA1/KA2 in February 2019 to showcase the outputs of the pilots and he experiences of the Dignity Diaries.

DIGNITY DIARIES   – BASIC OVERVIEW (5 min each progress feedback) followed by Q and A)

Those partners who have been able to record some dignity diaries presented their diaries for review with Ingrid and advice on presentation, editing and refinement.

Decision: Diaries need some standardisation. Using standard font for sub-titles etc.

Action: IMKT will issue some formatting guidelines.

Action: Dramblys to circulate slide used as final scene for diaries which hs all required components (EU logo and acknowledgement)

Action: IMKT to create a companion opening slide for partners to be slotted in.

Decision: The partner dignity diaries will be uploaded to the project website with a link to Ingrid’s LMF website. The DD page on the website needs more information. Discussion about the definition of Dignity and whether that should be elaborated in website.

Action: Ingrid to review wording.

Decision: Ingrid to compile an overarching report on the process of collecting the Dignity Diaries as an additional project output. Ingrid recorded some talking head conversations between partners at the Patras event to use for an interactive report.

Action: All partners to collate information and intelligence on the local refugee situation in each of their countries and how this has impacted on their participation.

PARTNER PILOTING EXPERIENCE – BASIC OVERVIEW (5 min each followed by 5 minutes partner Q and A)

Partners who have commenced activities reported on experience:

Dramblys: Dramblys have run a train the trainer event for social workers working with refugees and immigrants inValencia, Albacete and Alicante. Working with ACEM and red Cross. Facilitated these organisations to pilot model. Spent some time exploring the legal and social frameworks operating for refugees and migrants in Spain. These also the access for the 5 Dignity diaries which Miriam is recording. Feedback on YES Passport, very difficult for individuals to use this on its own, needs support to work through process. Request for YES Passport to be translated into Spanish.

Artemisszio ; Although have been able to access subjects for Dignity Diaries (Roma women) piloting is to be with young marginalised youth and has been scheduled now for later in term. Approach will be train the trainer with teachers and support to pilots of E4 model. Have worked on the supporting tools, editing and translating.

IMKT: Have planned some social media training but both Dignity Diaries and pilots affected first by wild fires across Greece and then by summer vacation. Pilots were arranged for beginning of September in two regions, working with those who have direct access to camps but were postponed once project extended.

ITPIO: Have found it difficult to access refugees in Bulgaria.Through Atanas personal network may access a Syrian refugee who is no longer in Bulgaria itself. State agencies like Red Cross are reluctant to give names of refugees but did offer access on a Saturday.

IST: Have been working on adapting the supporting tools on E4. To make sure the process works for deaf people is more complex. Have been able to film dignity diaries but also had a summer shut down so welcomed the extension period. Will work with other organisations who directly work with refugees.

SAY: Have spent some time trying to create a curriculum to support pilot. Found working through the A-Z wasn’t a useful approach- A-Z designed to be a learner give away? Pilot has started but had technical issues with YES Passport access for both team and learners which had to be resolved. Have met all milestones.

CCDOHave run a number of workshops with young people in a classroom set up. They also offer programmes offering direct training in skills such as tailoring and entrepreneurship. They have been using the YES Passport with young people and have produced material to be uploaded to the RITDHE website and E4 Tanzania website.

CIC: Have been working on refining the E4 tools for the online work experience zone. Have piloted the model with two small groups – Stevenage and Nottingham (latter were workers who engage with homeless people which features refugees) Have gathered feedback on the skills audit tool which they will tweak. Will be running a direct pilot in London in October 1 Dignity Diary completed which Ingrid trying to edit as sound quality very poor.

PLANNING FURTHER ACTIVITY

Dramblys:Will work on anothertrain the trainer event this autumn

Artemisszio: Will work with schools in November

IMKT: will work directly in refugee camps once secure access.

ITPIO: will look at ways of working with refugees in other countries as in Bulgaria refugees have a low profile and do not want to be identified.

IST: working with partners to develop pilots

SAY: If the programme is successful will consider mainstreaming in usual offer to beneficiaries but have to try it and evaluate it first. Need to review use of funding so far and what is available.

CCDO: Need to reflect on the extension and the budget changes.

CIC: Will work further n direct piloting of E4 and to complete 5 Dignity Diaries.

Action: All partners to review their personal budget spends and revised allocations, progress against existing milestones and capacity for further activity. To send brief overview to Breda of outline plans for extended period.

 

PROJECT DISSEMINATION

All partners need to consider how to exploit local events and local media to raise awareness of the project. Greg warned that in terms of project success there will be concerns by the EU if people are not visiting the project website, Facebook page and attracting new interest.

More input is required on the RITDHE website which does not have much active content. This needs social media links and partners need to feed in news stories, updates on their activity and the final versions of Dignity Diaries to broadcast.

Decision: The extension provides real opportunity to work on dissemination once the pilots have been delivered and reviewed and the Dignity Diaries collated.

Action: Breda to pass over URL for RITDHE website to IMKT to manage alongside Facebook and other social media. Some updating to be carried out before handover.

Action:IMKT will create an electronic newsletter which can be printable to enable distribution in camps etc.

Action: All partners: material is needed so partners need to supply potential content which can be then used for both website social media and newsletter as appropriate.Ingrid has interviewed partner reps during the meeting to get some impact of filming diaries and partner stories are also relevant to measuring impact.

Action: Partners to aim for one post per month of news updates or interesting material, stories and send to IMKT

Action: Ingrid needs to finalise the guide to creating Dignity Diaries and publish that on RITDHE website.

Action:Partners to try and do some follow up with those already filmed to see if stories have moved on?

Action: Partners need to make more use of own networks and social media contacts to publicise project and the project elements (Dignity Diaries and E4 model, including YES Passport)

Action: All partners whose contact details are not on partners page need to send Panos a paragraph with their named social media and project contact details, link to own website, (and one line about their organisation) (By 26th October)

Action: partners to send Panos transparent PNG image of their logo.

Action: Partners to identify events where they could publicise the project as part of other activity

Decision:Final Dissemination Event Thursday 20th June 2019

PROJECT COMMUNICATIONS

Decision: There are no funds for a further TNM except by making a request for amendment and using the board and lodging element. The Brussels project officers made it clear EACEA do not allow for extra travel requests. Once the costs of the second TNM have been realised consideration can be given to a further event subject to partners bearing travel costs? Otherwise communications have to be virtual.

Decision: Next project keep in touch will be a GoToMeeting call on 2nd November at 10.00am GMT

Action: Breda to create meeting and send invitation on calendar.

PROJECTREPORTING /AUDIT

LMF do not have to report again to Brussels until project closure but will need to keep track on progress. Not all partners responded with the progress reports requested by Breda but Ingrid will ask for updates in a similar format to keep track of where partners are progressing.

The nature of the Capacity Building funding is such that tighter audit controls are expected. Funding is not based on unit costs but on receipted actuals, except for flight costs and the Mobility event. Partners are requested to send details of their spending up until September to breda and then a further reconciliation will take place later in the Autumn and at the end of the February milestone.

FINAL WASH-UP AND SUMMARY

Ingrid thanked everyone for their participation in what was an intense and stimulating event. Sharing the Dignity Diaries was an emotional experience and reminded everyone of why they were undertaking the project, to try and allow refugees stories to be heard and to make some impact on their successful integration by improving their emotional resilience and employability.

 

ACKNOWLEDGMENT SPEECH TO THE DIRECTOR OF WATER FOR AFRICA

Dear Mr. Phil – Director of Water For Africa

https://www.givingway.com/donate/ccdo

Children care development organization (CCDO) is a non-governmental organization gears towards changing the community through care, respects and love, need for making the child come out of hopelessness by creating a conducive environment towards meaningful and progressive life. The CCDO was started on 13th October 2010 at Mkimbizi area. The main aim of this organization was taking care to orphans, children living in a difficult environment and girls who have lost hope because of early pregnancy. At the beginning we have started with caring of orphans, in 2015 we had 6 orphans (2 boys and 4 girls) we started by giving then a preliminary education that is nursery school. By the time we are having 105 orphans (43 boys and 62 girls).

Dear guest of honor we thank you and your team of WATER FOR AFRICA for helping us to get a well because Nduli area has a big problem of getting water especially during a dry season. The government through Iringa Rural and Urban Water Sanitation (IRUWASA) does not supply enough water to meet the needs of water to the people of Nduli area. Therefore this well will help our school and the community around us, for that we say thank you very much may GOD bless you on that.

On the side of girls and children living in difficult environment we gave them information and communication technology (ICT) and Tailoring skill. A program which has stopped due to the scarcity of money to pay to the instructors.

Dear guest of honor in any success there are challenges which can interfere or hinder the whole program, the following are the challenges we are facing in this center;

Firstly, transportation of children from their home to our school. We have a school bus capable of carrying 35 pupils at a time, this make us to have more than two routes of carrying children to school, this means we need to have a digger school bus than that we have now at least that will be capable of carrying 65 pupils at a time which will make us have one route to school and it will make us start lessons at a right time.

Secondly, we have a scarcity of buildings for our common use, for example we don’t have a dining hall for children to use when they are eating, by this time they either use their classes because it is a rainy season otherwise they just stay outside. But also we don’t have a favorable kitchen building with all its accessories and also we don’t have a workshop, we have accessories but we don’t have a suitable place for training, if we could have a workshop it could be better.

In order to manage this dear guest of honor we need sponsorship, so we kindly beg you to be our sponsor so as to make things go smoothly. And we beg you if you can help us in getting volunteers teachers and trainers who will help us in teaching and training in our center.

Dear guest of honor we have started building a new building for our school. Would you please go and lay a foundation stone so as to encourage us in our work and make us remember you whenever we read the foundation stone.

Let us thanks almighty God for making us alive and making us meet with you.

THANKS WATER FOR AFRICA

It’s we CCDO members

Thank you very much for listening us.

May GOD BLESS YOU

Request Small Donation for Drilling 1 Water Pump Well and 8 Toilet Holes Project

Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) is a not-profit organization located at Nduli village within Iringa District of Iringa Region in Tanzania. CCDO it works to improve the living standards of needy orphans aged from 1 – 17 years old irrespectively their gender, races and nationality. We have constructed our orphanage pre and primary school at Nduli village under our own local initiatives, but our orphanage school lacks clean water and toilets holes.

A daily challenge for orphans at CCDO Orphanage Home and School in Iringa is scarcity of clean water. Lack of potable water is at the root of many community problems, including spread of disease, school absenteeism, and lack of time for income generating activities. To combat these problems, the WASH (Water and Sanitation Hygiene) Program works in conjunction with the CCDO Orphanage Home and School to drill 1 (one) water well and implement water harvesting tanks for pre and primary school.

Currently, we have 102 pre and primary school needy orphans, 2 holes of toilet for girls and 2 toilet holes for boys, but we need to have 8 holes of toilets for girls and 8 holes of toilets for boys. We also need to drill 1 water pump well for our Orphanage Home and School. But due to our financial constraints we are unable to fulfill our dream that’s why we request you to support us the small humanitarian donation amounting $5800 that will help us to construct our school toilets, drill 1 (one) water pump well at our 8 purchased acres of land, such money donation will help us to buy 2 water tanks and 1 generator that will be used to pump water from our drilled water well to the water tank that will supply water to our school kitchen, toilets, at their dormitories while other water will be used to irrigate our school green vegetable garden for our school orphans well-being. With more donor support, the CCDO hopes to replicate these successes in other schools and community institutions as you can get this message from this orphans songs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnwHO05hwR0 

It is our hope that you will join with us and help to donate to our project, ifyou want to donate to this project just send your donation to our CCDO M-PESA NO: 0754813368 OR email to childrencareorg1@gmail.com

GIFT APPRECIATION 

We are very happy to announce that we have already received another shipment donated books titled “Happy Go Lucky: The Castle of Courage” from the generous Dr. Gordon DiPaolo, Professor of Management of The College of Staten Island School of Business and his wife Lorraine for their generous donation.

We thank Dr. Michael Provitera and Janeth Provitera who is the author of this book and for their contribution and kindly donation to our CCDO Orphanage School development. We thank Professor Michael Provitera to connect us with the humanitarian givers to our Centre like Dr.Gordon DiPaolo, Professor of Management of The College of Staten Island School of Business and his wife Lorraine for their generous donation to us.

The donated books was given to all our school orphans while a few copies was stored at our Dr. Michael Provitera Library, the constructed Library is beneficially to all our school and out of school children including our surrounding community of children for their employability skills growth.

Therefore, we request you to join with us to fund our Books Shipment Project for educating African children who are considered as vulnerable.

With your gifts and your help rallying support, we can educate and provide quality education to our misery children in Africa.

Your gift can be in terms of books, money, laptops, and volunteerism to come to work with us. The donated money will help us to purchase 150 iron which is needed to roofing our additional 4 classrooms.

We have constructed our additional 4 classrooms and teachers office but we are lacking only 150 iron sheet and 200 bags of cement for plastering our building as the below photo of our building expressing itself to you.

Your little money that you will donate to us will be used to drill 1 water well for our school children. This is because; our children suffer needlessly - walking miles for dirty water that makes them sick. You and I can change that. Please make a donation and then help us spread the word.

It would be amazing if you could help donate and reach our goal of raising $3500 for buying 150 iron sheets, 200 bags of cement, plastering our classrooms, buying school desks and tables, books, and drilling 1 water well for our CCDO Orphanage School. For more your humanely donation to us you can send your email to: childrencareorg1@gmail.com

 

This is how CCDO Centre and School will look like after its constructuon completion, please help us through your small donation, every coin you will donate to us will be invested as the said above

Volunteer at Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) in Tanzania / East Africa.

Volunteer at CCDO just click here: https://www.givingway.com/organization/ccdo to Apply! Volunteers Needed

Children Care Development Organization (CCDO) in Tanzania opportunities are available for international volunteers in orphanages, schools, vocational training (tailoring, carpentry, ICT, art crafts and culture, metal works, motor mechanics and garage, water ,sanitation and hygiene (WASH), farm fishing and climate change education, welding and community garden landscapes.

 

We work directly with the projects where we invite you to stay with us depending on your life interest and where your contribution will make a real and meaningful difference. You will be offered a personal and customisable placement service. You will be supported throughout the duration of your placement. We use our local knowledge and spend time in the community meeting your requirements, including working amongst the Masai.

You will work with HIV/AIDS orphans, many of whom are HIV positive. Others have been abandoned after birth.

We have orphanage projects in Njombe Region at Makete rural district for tree planting and vocational training projects along Kitulo National Park while also we have other activities in Iringa Region at Iringa Municipality where you can several times to Ruaha National Park where it takes almost 45 minutes to see our wonderful blessed animals and the biodiversity of Ruaha Landscapes. Orphans in Tanzania orphanages and Children’s homes are extremely disadvantaged and encounter a lot of hardships in their life. They are deprived of many opportunities necessary for their development. The children in our place orphanage projects have never experienced loving, caring and stable relationships.

As an orphanage volunteer, you will help vulnerable children. The children will receive much needed attention, compassion, hope, encouragement, support and love from you. Through the education and compassion they receive from you, the children are empowered to challenge life, poverty and exploitation.

CCDO placements or voluntary work with disadvantaged children is very fulfilling. Volunteering in orphanages in Kenya will be one of the most challenging positive, life-changing, and rewarding experiences of your life.

Volunteers also provide emotional support and foster compassion for people living with HIV/Aids in the community. Volunteers educate and counsel the community, schools and individuals.

AIDS orphans are often neglected in Africa. As a volunteer in this program, you will visit HIV/Aids clinics, and help meet the needs of AIDS orphans.

Volunteer opportunities are available amongst the Masai tribe of Tanzania. The volunteer jobs are close to the Masai Ruaha National Park, Isimani, Ilambilole, Iringa Municipality of Iringa Region in Tanzania.

Volunteers work in a rescue centre which accommodates Masai women and Masai girls rescued from forced marriages and those rescued from forced Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) practices.

Other volunteer work available includes teaching at CCDO Pre and Primary School and Professional Development Center located at Nduli village within Iringa Municipality of Iringa Region in Tanzania.

Volunteers on the teaching program in Tanzania assist with the teaching of different subjects in Tanzanian elementary and high schools.

Volunteer teachers can teach mathematics, science, geography, social sciences, history, business education, English, art and music, beauty and hair dressing, craft arts and culture, carpentry, metal works, computer, tailoring and fashion, welding, motor mechanics and garage, garden landscaping,

Our volunteers work in schools with students who come from very difficult economic circumstances or are orphans.

Please note that Tanzanian school holidays are in Easter holiday, June and December. No school teaching will be available during that period.

You can volunteer for any duration and stay as long as you wish. You can arrive at any time during the month and the volunteer work starts the following day.

You will typically work between 9am - 4pm Monday to Friday. Your will spend your spare time shopping, eating out, cinemas, chatting with other volunteers or swimming.

CCDO Volunteer Program is open to:

We invite individuals, couples, families, students, researchers, and groups (churches, colleges, and student associations).

Our programs are flexible and volunteers can arrive and depart on any day all year round.

CCDO Volunteer Fees in USD:

1)      Cost for 1 month $500

2)      Cost for 6 weeks $700

3)      Cost for 2 months $1000

4)      Cost for 10 weeks $1100

5)      Cost for 3 months $1200

6)      Cost for 4 months $1500

7)      Cost for 5 months $1700

8)      Cost for 6 months $1700

9)      Cost for 12 months $2400

Currency Converter.

The volunteer at CCDO program fee covers communication, airport pick up, local support, in-country orientation, training, supervision, accommodation and two meals per day (three meals over the weekends if you are at the provided accommodation).

The volunteer at CCDO costs you need to meet are: your flight to and from the country, visa fees, work permits, vaccinations, travel insurance, in-country transport and return trip to the airport.

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Mr. Charles Mkoma and Mr. Mario Rusek at Makete District after a successful talk about tree planting project...more info soon!https://www.givingway.com/organization/children-care-development-organization-ccdo/?context=apply